Thread regarding Amazon.com layoffs

Anti-Asian Hate Diversity misses the mark

To address the anti-asian hate crimes that this country is experiencing, AWS felt compelled to address this "head on" by having a 30-minute anti-asian hate message. The moderator was not an asian person and simply spoke to the history of asian racism in the United States. While this is a start, it missed the MOST IMPORTANT FACTOR of why it's hard for asians (past and present) to integrate into this country - it's the fact there is a major language and cultural difference that are polar opposites of the United States.

I challenge any US-english speaking person to visit Asia where the language is completely different than any language found in Europe. You will learn quickly that: 1/ you will be ignored, 2/ you will be considered uneducated for not speaking perfectly, 3/ when you do speak, you may offend people, 4/ general gestures are completely different, and 5/ you will never be considered for a leadership role.

From a cultural standpoint, Asian people have respect for their elders - period. There's no "ifs ands or buts" about it. This isn't the case in this country because the only thing that matters are things like money, social status, and power. Additionally, some asian cultures choose to embrace the US ways, not because they have to but its because they need to. This stems from the fact 2nd+ generation asians know we're mis-understood by our looks alone and we want our fair share to succeed. BUT we know this does not work because main stream media, the film and music industry and our college institutions do not portray asians in a manner based on merit vs. the "look" (or appearance) those industries "want to see". Question is, why would a 3rd generation asian person appear to US citizens as foreigner?!

Thanks Amazon for trying but its clear you and the Diversity team doesn't understand much about Asian people other than the ones "you choose" to know.

by
| 955 views | | 10 replies (last )
Post ID: @OP+1a8uqziq

10 replies (most recent on top)

Based on the recent Diversity training, I would agree. The key is having the executives on to listen to these stories but we know that will never happen. In a year or so, this will either be all forgotten or we’ll go through the motions on an annual basis.

by
|
Post ID: @9kzf+1a8uqziq

If they cared about the brutal attacks on Asian people they should address a certain demographic condemning these heinous and racist attacks against all people of Asian descent. But since all condemnation is pointing towards being too white I wouldn't expect any changes soon with Amazon

by
|
Post ID: @3fyl+1a8uqziq

I’ve read these posts are sad and I didn’t know Asians had these types of attacks and reactions. There’s no doubt the US school systems and Diversity teams miss a huge part of Asian history that translates into their US lives. I’ve read just a little on Asian history and indeed is complex and is just filled with war. I can only imagine a lot of the travesties of the past still live within Asian communities.

Continue to share posts like these because it only reminds me how becoming a US citizen doesn’t erase your past.

by
|
Post ID: @3xnk+1a8uqziq

I remember my mom being laughed at when a group of guys were telling my mom how ugly she was. They told her that they wouldn’t let a broom stick near her private parts. Bystanders were either laughing at her or upset with my mom because she remained silent and smiled at them. Little did anyone know in Japanese culture smiling is what you do to avoid showing emotions. The sad part is my mom understood every word and every now and again, I can tell she relives that moment because she cries alone.

by
|
Post ID: @2vqx+1a8uqziq

I’ll share my story here since other Amazonians are sharing.

I had an older sister once, I was a long time ago. I don’t remember her face or what she sounded like anymore but I remember she was always with me. My older sister was born in China, back then they had the one child law and having a female baby was bad. My parents wanting a son but loving their daughter figured if they moved out of China they can have that perfect family. Few years go by, my parents finally make it to the US. I was about 4 years old while my sister was 9 when she was kidnapped and raped by a group of boys. Police found her, never found the assailants and this scarred my family for life. Less than a year later, my sister committed s–c-de and she was gone. None of this made the news and this just falls between the cracks of Asian society. For my parents, I can only imagine how terrible they felt leaving one bad situation for another.

I may be a US citizen by birth but I’ve already lost my American dream when my sister died. What’s happening now is making things worse. Asians never had it easy, neither in Asia or the US, at least not the ones that posted here.

by
|
Post ID: @2wej+1a8uqziq

Just wanted to chime in here to help the diversity team about Asian society. Asian history is very complex, filled with war and atrocities that begin well before the United States. Many Asian countries still whole grudges among the nations, things we still see today. Even with this, many Asians are proud of this history. This is no different than European, Mediterranean, Russian, Middle East and African countries because they have always existed among one another. Speaking to the English barrier, many non-US countries tend to speak (pretty well) a second or third language. This is probably due to the fact not being able to speak to one another automatically creates division. Unfortunately for Asians, speaking American English isn’t easy since many do not follow proper English grammar rules. I can attest my cousins from Asia speak proper English but it sounds wierd because they don’t follow conventional American conventions and slangs. This language barrier might be the reason why Asians were dubbed “model minorities” - again a term that wouldn’t make sense to an Asian person in the mid-1900’s.

The United States rarely touches in Asian history and the stories that surround them - some stories that I read here. I don’t expect people to go out and learn this right now but it would help in understanding the Asian mindset and the promise of the United States.

by
|
Post ID: @1xlr+1a8uqziq

Why doesn’t Amazon Prime make a documentary about the history and origin of diseases and viruses? I’m fairly certain China isn’t the only source of viruses.

by
|
Post ID: @1cof+1a8uqziq

My dad lost his 2 brothers and 4 sisters during the Korean War. Its been such a long time but he still hopes he will reunite with them. Because of this, there has always been an air of sadness, defeat and depression as I grew up. My dad pushes success onto me and I believe it’s because of his loss, as well as others that lost family. As everyone knows, succeeding in America isn’t easy to do but success in my eyes is keeping your family safe and happy. This isn’t quite the American dream but it’s a dream I know I can reach.

by
|
Post ID: @1fgv+1a8uqziq

My parents migrated to the US because of the Vietnam war. As a kid, I remember days where I would work on the streets selling small bags of rice for about 10 cents. We lived in a destitute village where it was everyone for themselves - people stealing food and money from one another. I remember our parents trying to get into one of the US ships to escape the war only to get turned around. We ended up having to pay fisherman to take us away from the war. My family was split into 5 different boats because of all the chaos that was happening. I ended up losing 2 aunts and 3 cousins because they were k–led for their money and thrown over baked. We were told that our aunts were probably sold off as s-x slaves and they were never heard of again. My parents and I got lucky and was on a good boat however, when we docked we were stripped of all our money. I don’t recall much after this but we ended up getting sponsored by one family member in the US and we were able to emigrate into the US - we had literally nothing.

I thought I grew up in a bad situation until I asked about my grandparents. When I was old enough my parents told me about their parents. Basically my grandparents were k–led by the French. I was told that the French would bury entire families in the ground with only their heads exposed and would use a bull dozer to decapitate them. They did this because it was cheaper than wasting machine gun bullets.

I can’t express how much pain Asians live with, even after decades of time passing by, we still feel the pain. The language barrier played a huge role because people could not understand our begging and pleading for their lives.

It’s easy to hate a race because they are different. The funny thing is, we are the same in terms of the misery our races suffered in the past and it’s why it doesn’t make sense that these same races hate each other.

by
|
Post ID: @1mkn+1a8uqziq

My asian parents migrated to the US and lost their jobs as doctors. The promise was if they worked for the US army that they'd be taught english and work in America. They were stationed in Germany and began speaking German instead of english. They were dumped off in Los Angeles where they had to take a college level medical exam and failed (of course). The ended up opening a small hair salon in Texas and barely made ends meat. I remember the store we worked at getting robbed monthly. The worst part of this memory is my mom "thanking" the armed robber for not k–ling her kids. This is a shining example of the "default respect" (not cowardice) that lives in Asian people. We see the bigger picture that we believe is strength but is easily re-interpreted as weakness.

by
|
Post ID: @quy+1a8uqziq
This thread has been archived. Posting is disabled.