Thread regarding DXC Technology layoffs

why do so many talented people stay at DXC?

I left DXC a few months ago and was somewhat surprised to find that all other IT companies do not operate like DXC (they give pay rises, no BAU redundancy programs and most have happy customers and are growing).

The question I have is WHY do so many good people stay at DXC when year on year they get no pay rise, see their colleagues WFR'd and disappear without a trace, have clients that are perpetually disappointed with the service quality and work in an organisation that uses antiquated systems and processes?

Is it the fear of change, are people holding out for the payout or do they think that all IT companies are the same so no point in moving ?

by
| 2632 views | | 19 replies (last )
Post ID: @OP+1an3k59f

19 replies (most recent on top)

At 65 years of age and 8 years service and now able to work from home it suits me to stay on and wait for the inevatble WFR in the next year or so.

I don't enjoy what I do anymore, but not ready to retire just yet. Work remotely have have done so for 99.99% of by time at DXC and I am not on call.

If my review is not exceeds expectations, then I'll just slow down even more till they WFR me, in the US only maybe a months pay if that, but better than no pay at all.

I used to be a manager at a life before DXC , each cost center was budgeted a dollar amount and at the actual employee to manager review the pay increase was given out. No waiting till the 2nd quarter, review and pay raises or not on the spot.

The board keeps getting stock options for ZERO cost and their increases so we should too

by
|
Post ID: @4for+1an3k59f

I was WFRed last year and now looking back at my time with DXC, I must say the only reason I stuck to the company was that nobody really gives a sh1te what you are doing. You have so much freedom, sometimes it feels like you are being paid to do things that really matter in your life.

At some point, it really suited my personal life as I had to regain my emotional/mental and physical well-being. I just graduated from college when DXC threw me under the bus for a big client here in Europe with weekly travels to client-site. Toxic project environment, management didn't want me to assign to another client, and I was effing afraid that I wouldn't find another job with that little experience shortly after my graduation.

But when you recognise they really give a damn about how you are doing and you just need to bring in billable hours, you can really turn the table - which is what I did. Because of my intense travel engagements and the local laws we have in my country, I effectively had a 3.5 day work-week, could really focus on myself, found my own self-worth again and could just re-start.

Also, I had the pleasure to get another position which was much more suitable to me and allowed me to gain valuable experience in just 10 months until I got WFR'ed but that experience allowed me to land a new job just within weeks after I was WFR'ed and was still serving notice period.

Having said that, we are all in different positions in life and we are all in our own respective lanes. There's certainly a pattern why good people stay at DXC.

All I'm trying to say is that no matter how hard it might be for some in this situation, you can really leverage from this whole experience and make the best of it if you stop being stuck in the victim role in this drama triangle.

DXC management thinks they can sc..w you hard but at the end, they are just kicking their own ba..s all the time.

by
|
Post ID: @4jmg+1an3k59f

like many people commenting here I had a job with DXC not a career. I my time there I met many like me that knew they were getting shafted with no pay rise and no promotions but had managed to find a way to fit their job around their lifestyle. Much of the time the remote working was a key reason people stayed. I did wonder when in ANZ there was a push to get people back to the office why it wasn't obvious to snr management that this would end in tears.

Apart from grads can't say I met many people in DXC who viewed what they did there as a career it was almost always a job

by
|
Post ID: @2eth+1an3k59f

Here's a question for the thinkers.... DXC are currently chasing margin expansion.

Is that going to be achieved just by trying to shrink the payroll? Binning highly paid, rehiring cheap.

by
|
Post ID: @2jdk+1an3k59f

DXC is truly lost, as they have no view on who is delivering value (good, well appreciated work for clients) and who is just entering time - mainly due to totally ineffectual management! Margin seeps away from the start of a proposal, with 20-30 people teams working months because the people who did it before have left! Deals that are won get staffed by contractors (that skim margin even further) as the 'blunt' WFR takes out too many 'gem' employees. The CEO does not have his finger on the pulse, he is play acting... DXC cannot make money when charging 10% above going rate, how can they survive.. TCS and Infosys are operating at near 25% margins..

by
|
Post ID: @2lqw+1an3k59f

The 'fight for WFR' probably means they were asking their line manager to approve their application to take voluntary redundancy (additional payments), as they would leave anyway (resign). Nothing in it for the manager in that case. So its not fighting, its asking.

Removing grads doesn't generally remove much from the cost, but allowing them to be WFR'd than resign can be counted as a forced reduction count against the target placed on the Line Manager, so it might be in the Line Manager's interest to have the person be counted as WFR'd albeit with a small additional payout.

Losing a grad isn't much of the bottom line, but can affect the recovery as the line manager has to get a more costly resource to backfill the work of the grad knowing the backfill won't be effective, as the remaining resources are already overloaded.

Hiring is just such an expensive process that if DXC can't hold onto the new folk they get through the door, then they got problems. But we all know that.

by
|
Post ID: @2dcr+1an3k59f

At 62 years of age and 26 years service and now able to work from home it suits me to stay on and wait for the inevatble WFR in the next year or so.
I still enjoy what I do, I have a great customer and the hours I "have" to work are fine by me.
Dont get me wrong, DXC has shafted me as well with payrises/promotions but for a mid to high 5 figure payoff I'll hange on.

by
|
Post ID: @2nuo+1an3k59f

"It was great to leave, just waited for the shiny WFR and asked for it voluntarily - after a fight got it" - Can anyone tell me how the h–l you can ask and fight for a WFR? I'd imagine a manager can position themselves into a WFR but it makes no sense to me how you can ask to be WFR'd. What possibly is in it for DXC if you are not on the list of people they want to let go?

by
|
Post ID: @2quv+1an3k59f

It was great to leave, just waited for the shiny WFR and asked for it voluntarily - after a fight got it. I'd stick around for it again and I'll tell you the company I work for now, I was shocked. Well treated, much higher salary for less stress, Pay rises, bonuses and training. I'll give HPE and DXC one thing. They promoted me right up with no pay rise and I was pi—d, but retrospetively the experience made me really employable and prove an 'intermediate could do a senior job', swim and not sink. Sorted my career and made me damn employable at a young age for a awesome salary. Many other ex grads in this position. Only thing I'm grateful for. Customer was raging when I went, but happy I was escaping. But guess what, the company screwed me and I came out on top. So would say was a good resource, depending on who you ask, but they screwed themselves, by letting go of the good ones.

by
|
Post ID: @2ctr+1an3k59f

I was WFRd and quickly found a new job with a competitor. Here they treat their employees right. They know the value of the employees to their business. Comparative benefits, but here we get raises, promotions, and bonuses. Can't beat that! In addition, I have happiness. There is life after DXC.

by
|
Post ID: @2trf+1an3k59f

I think a lot in Europe would be hanging on for the hope of a voluntary redundancy after quite a few years of service but if you are someone here who is constantly in demand it is unlikely that WFR opportunity is going to come about meanwhile you'll see useless managers and those individual contributors who contribute nothing but somehow get away with it manufacture that they end up being WFR'd. So probably it is best to leave on our own terms and surprise a few people. The apparent lack of bonus and pay review for yet another year might just be enough to make a number of people walk. Am contemplating it.

by
|
Post ID: @1trd+1an3k59f

I rather be unemployed than work at DXC. No more people with skills, just resumes, lost every resource I had and continued to cut so a yr ago wfr was a blessing. Still out of work but happy!!

by
|
Post ID: @1muw+1an3k59f

Some of us stay because it avoids a hellish commute to another job, we aren't chasing after money, we help care for elderly parents, we like what we do and the people we work with. As for me, I am retiring after 40 years of IT work. I've seen many false promises from corporate management for decades regarding how we are valued, how they are going to turn things around, etc. Much of it is said just to keep the false hopes up so employees stick around and continue slogging through a series of job tasks with no real career plan.

by
|
Post ID: @1srz+1an3k59f

"It's the only company I ever worked for where in inflation-adjusted terms my pay and benefits reduced from one year to the next.''

so why do you stay there?

by
|
Post ID: @1jup+1an3k59f

It's the only company I ever worked for where in inflation-adjusted terms my pay and benefits reduced from one year to the next.

After 10 years of working for CSC (now DXC) I was effectively expected to do five days work for four and a half days pay. And they wondered why I was less than motivated... I was pleased to leave with a redundancy pay-off.

Whenever they get a new global head honcho he wants to make an impression by improving profitability, and the quickest way to improve profitability is to cut costs, which usually means cutting staff. Likewise when the head honcho has been there a while and his ludicrously-large bonus is tied to profit levels.

I was increasingly coming to the conclusion that they'll only be happy when they've cut costs to the point that they have no staff at all. At that point it may dawn on them that they also have no customers!

Staff aren't just a cost but the means to deliver a service, satisfy the customers, and make profits!

by
|
Post ID: @1ufv+1an3k59f

Everyone expect to be merged DXC from the Big one.

by
|
Post ID: @1ney+1an3k59f

i used to think that all big IT orgs were the same....until I left DXC.

I had a nice surprise to be working in an environment where no redundancies were happening, business seemed to be growing and new people were joining. My manager mentioned incentive bonuses and a promotion pathway. It took me a good 6 months to convince myself I wasn't dreaming!!!

My recommendation to anyone still at DXC is to formulae an escape plan. Even if you don't act on it immediately its a good idea to have it ready to go

by
|
Post ID: @1iei+1an3k59f

I also assumed it's similar everywhere. Same s–t, different smell.

But, after leaving DXC you realise, it's different. And it's mixed. At most other companies you are valued as a person, you can grow, ... . Obvioulsy some people will have negative experiences as well.
But more than 95% of my former HPE/CSC/CSC collegues who left, have moved into a positive work experience.

by
|
Post ID: @1pjp+1an3k59f

If you're rainmaking with billable hours, what the rest of DXC is doing is irrelevant.

by
|
Post ID: @1zss+1an3k59f

Post a reply

: