Thread regarding General Motors layoffs

GM vehicle quality & reliability VS the competition

As a current owner of a 2018 Chevy Impala LT with the 3.6L V6, it’s been the most trouble free and reliable car I’ve ever owned. I just want to thank the men and woman who built these cars as they are very under appreciated and valued in the market place. It’s well put together and runs extremely smooth. My car just passed a little over 103,000 miles. No issues at all!! Just routine maintenance.

I believe GM’s Epsilon II platform which is the Chevy Impala, Buick LaCrosse and the Cadillac XTS was one of GM’s best sedan platform in decades. Much better than the Malibu and lesser end models for sure. It’s like GM put a lot of effort, money and engineering into the platform.

However, as employees of GM, how would you compare its vehicles in terms of quality control, quality of its materials such as interior/exterior trim, drivetrain components and other parts vs Ford, Dodge, and other foreign competition? Because lately it seems like the company is seriously lagging behind other brands when it comes to styling, engineering and build quality within certain models. For instance just other day I went to my local Chevy dealer and checked out the new Blazers, and noticed that the weatherstripping on the passenger side front door was dangling loose and came off when I barely pulled on it. The interior plastics and trim felt very very cheap. To the point where you could easily break something with the slightest touch. They also lag behind in feature content for the price as well.

Also, why are GM 4 cylinder engines so unrefined and unreliable? Especially in the Chevy Cruze and the 2.5L 4 banger that GM puts in everything.

Also how is GM culture and does the company truly care about building high quality reliable vehicles or not really?

Any responses will be greatly appreciated.

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| 1617 views | | 13 replies (last )
Post ID: @OP+1aoljze6

13 replies (most recent on top)

Some overpaid pseudoyuppie from SE MI who probably gets a brand new leased car every two years worked hard on making a poor quality engine...I bet that single mother who could only afford a used Impala or whatever worked hard, too. Even sprung for the V6! Then gets stranded not knowing if she's going to lose her job because some hard working managers signed off on an engine THEY KNEW would break down on those who could least afford it.
This is the true ethics of General Motors. This is how the company works. There is no empathy, there is no humanity. This brings back horrible memories of that disgusting company.

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Post ID: @Reii+1aoljze6

I worked at GM for 20 years. Now I work outside the auto industry so I get to hear everyone's complaints when they know I worked at GM. The biggest difference between GM and most Japanese manufacturers is it seems like there is at least one part going bad after 5 years of use for GM. It seems like you are always being nickled and dimed with repairs with GM vehicles. While that does not seem to be the case with manufacturers like Toyota. I think that goes to what GM is willing to pay as far as the median lifetime expectancy for parts. But the complaints I have heard have not changed i.e. I don't see the improvement in GM repairs.

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Post ID: @Otqx+1aoljze6

As someone that touches on some of the items you ask about imo we are bound by metrics at times that are disconnected from reality and the best interests of the customer. For example I was working on a warranty project where we knew full well the part would need to be replaced multiple times throughout the vehicles life. However no one would cough up the cost to fix the issue because most of the failures were outside of warranty and it was thought to be someone else’s problem. No consideration of customer satisfaction/retention.

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Post ID: @byga+1aoljze6

Owner of a 2016 Silverado since it rolled off the hauler and the cab corners are rusted out already. 5 years and a body panel is junk. Last GM I ever buy.

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Post ID: @acfn+1aoljze6

GM vehicles generally still suffer from issues which the Japanese brands have solved decades ago. Oil leaks, water entry, wiring, switches, sensors, etc. Just do a search for "GM recall" and see how many hits there are.

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Post ID: @6ihm+1aoljze6

HFV6 did have many supplier quality issues, but to be honest all auto manufacturers do.
I do know for a fact the engineering teams worked very hard on this engine to make it right for the customer's,
I remember also working on the HVV6 and it was a great engine before GM discontinued it. 3.9 L was a rocket with good mpgs.

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Post ID: @6efz+1aoljze6

I have a 2011 cts Cadillac, HFV6
No issues at all, transmission is good too.

Lucky I guess.

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Post ID: @6jao+1aoljze6

I'm sure GM is still winning awards from companies it pays to say it won their awards.

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Post ID: @2ort+1aoljze6

They used to call the 3.6 the High Failure V6...inside GM. I guess they ironed out the major bugs after a while but it is just another example of the gamble you take with a General Motors vehicle. It's a gamble as far as which parts at which time on which vehicles are going to fail prematurely.

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Post ID: @1kqz+1aoljze6

I understand that 103,000 miles today means most vehicles are barely broken in, but knowing how many recalls and engine problems they’re have been in the industry lately especially with turbo-charged engines, it’s nice to know that GM’s later LFX 3.6L V6 with the 6 speed transmission should last a very long time without issues. Not including the electronics which GM hasn’t been known to build reliable electronic parts in years. They were extremely reliable such as power window motors and door locks up until the 80’s or so then there electrical devices got shoddy. It improved somewhat in the 90’s then went to h–l in the early 2000’s.

I just wish the culture of “Customer First” was GM’s priority instead of them being just a number. It’s really simple, build high quality reliable vehicles that last forever with rarely any issues, and you will have returning customers for life. Toyota mastered this philosophy in the 90’s.

GM used to build works of art, masterpieces on wheels with great quality and engineering from the 40’s-60’s and it sorta fell apart in the 70’s, but more so in the 80’s.

I am sure it even frustrated and pi—d off current and past GM employees knowing that the company was once at the forefront in many areas of the industry and it cared about being the best automaker in the world. Now, they’re a former giant that produces so so products these days. Nothing amazing or spectacular, just “Good-Enough”.

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Post ID: @1epq+1aoljze6

103,000 was a big deal in the early eighties

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Post ID: @1xfc+1aoljze6

GM tends to be in denial about quality issues. The blame is placed on the customer or the dealer. The internet has endless stories about well known problems from design / quality / assembly that GM refuses to help loyal customers with. This alienates a lot of buyers, who won’t ever buy another GM product. Most GM vehicles tested in major automobile publications rate as mediocre.

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Post ID: @keb+1aoljze6

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