Thread regarding Ricoh layoffs

Employee morale is getting worse by the day

It's disheartening to see how little this company cares about its employees and how it's been affecting everybody who works here. Employee morale is close to hitting rock bottom. So many are leaving or looking to leave because they just want to get away from this place. How did the leadership allow for things to get this bad?

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Post ID: @OP+1bKCLFgB

8 replies (most recent on top)

There was a good article about the SEC violation, debt and how xerox raised 2.5 billion and reorganized. Good article around the same time below on how ikon bumbled all over themselves trying and failing to evolve...not a company I ever found a reason to take seriously. Ikon people found a good home at ricoh.
https://www.wsj.com/articles/SB951253519964059274

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Post ID: @cpvu+1bKCLFgB

by 2001, Xerox was on the verge of bankruptcy. there was a very good article in businessweek around that time about the company's fall from grace...

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Post ID: @ckxs+1bKCLFgB

Think your history lesson is subjectively skewed. Equating ikon with xerox prestige back in the day is more than a bit of a stretch. Ikon’s success had little to do with romanticized notions of toughness or sales rep skill. They were able to offer 3 different manufacturer quality/price tiers that matched with an industry that was starting to slide into commoditization. I was at ricoh when the ikon reps came over and they certainly were n’t SPIN selling... they were pencil selling but that matched well with the commodity buyer. No cold calling when they came over either. Ikon reps very much preferred to Farm.

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Post ID: @boni+1bKCLFgB

a little history lesson...IKON was eating Xerox's lunch back in the 90s and 2000s. They were a big conglomerate dealer channel that sold Ricoh, Canon, and Sharp; oh, and Oce for high volume. They had national scale and sold to all size of customer from smb to enterprise, and gov/educ/med. The independent dealers had better customer service but were fighting over scraps. Most big companies with a fleet of copiers went with Xerox or IKON. Smaller companies like Minolta, and Konica, or Panasonic and Toshiba sold by offering lower prices. Even Canon was a new direct sales channel back in 2002; previously they only sold through dealers.

Back then, it was more prestigious to have Xerox or IKON on your resume as a job where you had to do hard core sales, and it was always survival of the fittest. That's why the top 20% will always account for 80% of their company's sales. But, alas, you are correct when you say they went downhill after Ricoh purchased IKON. When you say copier salesperson nowadays, people wonder "is that still a thing?"

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Post ID: @butg+1bKCLFgB

@6mqz+1bKCLFgB, Very much agree with everything said but it depends which Ricoh dealer. Some are absolute awful compared to direct.

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Post ID: @6odo+1bKCLFgB

If you look most of the IKON people have left senior management. Nearly all regional or higher management are either prior Ricoh or come from outside companies. Most of the IKON senior leadership left as the comp plans offered by Ricoh paid them significantly less than what they were making at IKON.
What they did was adopt most of the IKON structure and methods which were often flawed causing a almost constant downward trend at IKON . From personal experience I can tell you senior leadership is way out of touch with what actually happens at the field level. They look at trends, misdiagnosis the causes, then create a bonus opportunity for them around it. Then management makes all decisions based on how it will affect their bonus payout. For example is a team is understaffed causing response time problems. Everyone from the FTSM, technicians, sales and even the customer can see that is the issue not enough techs. If their bonus payout is dependent on keeping staffing below a specific level, they will never add or replace people. If their own metrics say they team need additional people they will change metric to so that it no longer shows a need.
They sell a gourmet meal, but only want to spend fast food prices to supply it. Somehow dealers are better able to provide a better, more profitable product despite the advantages of scale that Ricoh has.

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Post ID: @6mqz+1bKCLFgB

Employee moral went straight down the toilet as soon as they took over Ikon. Ikon was the worst possible move they could've done. They took a company that was failing on paper and then proceeded to remove all the Ricoh duplicates which just proves that Ricoh upper management has sh-t for brains.

When I first come to Ricoh, it was the sh-t. Over 10 years later, the job is laughable. Favoritism is common place. He-l, they had a former employee that I know report one of our superiors at the time for bluntly stopping him from getting a job. HR tells him, well you're no longer an employee?

Soo let me understand this, right? If someone commits a crime and then hides it as long as I am not an employee it's not a problem. Sh-t! If that's your mentality, you are an id--t.

The company is trash. People are convincing themselves to stay because they are scared of the unknown. Let me tell you something, the unknown is better than whatever you would call that trash!

Ricoh will fail. It's a matter of time. Its going to happen, I used to see them everywhere 10 years ago. Now, no one knows who the he-l they even are.

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Post ID: @3tdm+1bKCLFgB

I don’t think ricoh ever had any real leadership which is the key ingredient to the misery soup your stewing in. Xerox invents the photocopier and Ricoh produces a knockoff for a cheaper price. Every move made after that is based on what xerox does and where has that got them? Neon toner and buying out mediocre companies with offerings they couldn’t dream of developing in house. If Ricoh never existed would today look any different? Nope. If you can, get out of that dump and do something inspiring with your life.

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Post ID: @1ten+1bKCLFgB

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