Thread regarding Cengage layoffs

Leaving for less pay

Of course, this is not the best option, but I wonder how many people agreed to a lower pay just to get out of here as soon as possible? I am in a big dilemma whether to accept such an offer. I don’t believe there are many of those who got better pay and better job in any other sense.

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Post ID: @OP+1c4177xB

13 replies (most recent on top)

I think this thread is mostly BS. just like your linkedin. You make a lot of statements but don’t back them up with numbers. (X percentage , made big bonuses. ). if you are really a sales person you would have used real numbers. my salary is 75k and i made a 50k bonus. or i was promoted into leadership and received. a 10% raise on a 75k salary. You suggest industry is dead, best to leave ,,, blah blah. back it up with some real numbers.

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Post ID: @8ymz+1c4177xB

I was able to quadruple my income by flexing my onlyfans account and securing 5,000 more subscriptions. Life is good of you got it girls, and I definitely flaunt it. Ibiza here I come!

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Post ID: @5wca+1c4177xB

I did it. Same industry, same position with a rival company. Not one of the big three, an independent. 25% salary increase, much better benefits and old-school bonuses each year ($30-45k/yr, on average). Publishing is far from dead, trust me.

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Post ID: @4mxb+1c4177xB

I spent many years at Thomson and only a couple at Cengage. I made good money, as I was in sales. I knocked down some really...really nice bonus checks.

I always looked at it as a lifestyle job. My boss didn't really care what I did as long as I made my number. I had unlimited T&E. And I performed. I had a blast at sales meetings, ate great dinners and drove my company car all over the U.S. I think I only missed my number twice.

Those days vanished in about 2005. I think they would have vanished even if Thomson did not sell. They've vanished at all the other educational publishers. We lived like paupers compared to how to the Pearson sales teams lived.

I took a 20% pay cut to change industries and never looked back. I knew that things would never be the same.

But the days of big bonuses are over. As are the expensive dinners, fun travel and happy colleagues.

I'm long gone from the business but would never recommend a friend or family member to start a career at Pearson, Cengage or MGH. I'm not sure the business is even a viable option for start ups. Its all just a race to the bottom.

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Post ID: @2ust+1c4177xB

Get out of academia. Marxists only allow the Chairman to make money, the rest are just peasants. Do you want to be a peasant?

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Post ID: @2hyf+1c4177xB

You might need to take a slightly lower wage to get into a different—but ultimately higher paying—industry since not all of your skills may be transferable. But within a year you’ll have regained what you lost and be looking forward to a career with far more potential. So just make sure the new industry is one that ultimately pays more.

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Post ID: @2hur+1c4177xB

Cengage is like commercial banking. Everyone is a Vice President. No one makes any money.

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Post ID: @2mwj+1c4177xB

If you’re on the tech side you really will make more by leaving and changing industries. If you’re someone on the editorial side the skill set just isn’t there.

Cengage is kind of like academia in that some of the longtime content people have such an antiquated skill set that it’s harder to change industries.

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Post ID: @1yxu+1c4177xB

@1gwh+1c4177xB Cengage employees absolutely undervalue their true market worth and its not an accident. I was there for 10 years and received many promotions along the way. The problem was the pay increases never matched the title and/or additional responsibility. I was always told that my raises were "the maximum percentage allowed" which was nice for the company because if you only allow X% bump with each promotion you can depress salaries across the entire company. I knew a few people who eventually got salary adjustments but it was a herculean task that required moving heaven and earth. What it results in is a lot of fancy titles but a fraction of what the real world compensation should be. If you're there long enough you start to believe that's just how it is. On top of that merit increases were usually a joke because "we had a bad year/the industry is down/we didn't have much of a merit increase pool, etc etc." I knew pay wasn't great at Cengage but was absolutely shocked at how dismal they were once I got outside the industry. But Cengage doesn't care because they can hire some kid with 2 years of experience who doesn't know any better. Then they cycle starts again.

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Post ID: @1yjw+1c4177xB

If you are looking outside of the industry and have marketable skills you should absolutely 100% be able to find a better paying job. If you're just bouncing between Pearson/McGraw/Cengage you're not going to get anywhere because they all pay about the same and have similar cultures and structures. I left for a different industry and a 30% raise without negotiating. I didn't know how poorly Cengage paid relative to other companies until I left.

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Post ID: @1cfr+1c4177xB

For anyone on the editorial side Chick Fil a or Starbucks would pay a competitive wage.

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Post ID: @1jvq+1c4177xB

I left and doubled my Cengage pay in about a year. Left the industry and, it turns out, my experience was valued higher in other fields. What I've personally noticed in long-term Gale/Cengage employees is that they completely undervalue their experience and their worth.

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Post ID: @1gwh+1c4177xB

I did and it was totally worth it. I think the issue isnt so much as leaving as it is getting out of the industry totally. Thats where you need to focus your efforts.

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Post ID: @1nqh+1c4177xB

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