Thread regarding Pearson PLC layoffs

Mid-career

I’ve been thinking of changing industries but to be honest I’m not sure if it’s a good idea. I’m mid-career and the thought of starting over terrifies me. Have any former or current employees made the switch and if so were you happy with the move? Was it difficult starting over? Any information on what the experience was like would be helpful.

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Post ID: @OP+1c971nfY

13 replies (most recent on top)

Leaving Pearson was the best decision of my life. I was unemployed for 6 months while I broke into another industry, but I had saved up a ton, knowing I needed a break after leaving the hellscape that is Pearson. I’m now in a rapidly growing industry where I hit my sales target easily and the culture is healthy. Get out while you can, there’s so much more out there.

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Post ID: @8tkr+1c971nfY

Why is a very similar question posted on the Cengage Layoff page as well? And almost certainly written by the same person.

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Post ID: @2ugq+1c971nfY

Pearson has a way of spinning their failure to be the industry’s fault. It’s not. The EdTech industry is a great place to be. If learning technology truly bores you, though, it’s possible to change industries as long as you don’t talk too much about what you actually did on the day-to-day at Pearson. For example, if you’re in sales, an AdTech company will want to hear about sales. They’ll look at you like you’re insane if you tell them you spent most of your time forcing your existing business to “go digital”

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Post ID: @2dqv+1c971nfY

Pearson is not, never has been and never will be an ed tech company. They paid $500mm for eCollege, a true ed tech company and ki---d it.

It is a dinosaur, trying to escape the giant meteorite that hit the earth and blocked out the sun. Like the dinosaurs, its fate is already sealed.

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Post ID: @2vcp+1c971nfY

Don't hesitate and there may not be a better job market in which to do it. I lingered way too long due to the severance on the table but in the end it wasn't worth it. I did take a step back in title (not salary...funny how that works) but in two years I've taken two steps forward beyond anywhere I'd thought possible at Pearson. It's liberating working at a growing company that values employees and isn't always asking for more to be done with less.

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Post ID: @2kxz+1c971nfY

Do it. It was difficult but incredibly rewarding. Now is the time.

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Post ID: @2tjd+1c971nfY

It’s absolutely not that the EdTech market is dying, it’s that Pearson is not innovating. Big difference!

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Post ID: @1pup+1c971nfY

I love how people are saying EdTech is a dying industry.. Ed tech and the innovation that surrounds it is alive and well. no, Pearson & cengage are a dying company.. “Innovating” the way students purchase a product, but still delivering the same cr---y tech is what gives the industry a hard look. Trust me there is amazing things happening in the industry, from k-12 to higher Ed. So..Don’t be timid, believe in yourself and go get what you want!

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Post ID: @1vkv+1c971nfY

Don't overthink it. Just do it.
If you are not happy, you need to move out for your own sake.

The market is super hot. If you have transferable skills, you should ask for a higher salary. Don't sell yourself short.

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Post ID: @1pwr+1c971nfY

Get out of Pearson as quickly as you can. When the axe dropped on me, I ended up with a 50% compensation increase when I landed elsewhere. The abuse I tolerated in the last year at Pearson was unconscionable. Beyond that, I'd say get out of educational software altogether. Its future is dim and why waste your talents every day in a dying industry? Choose an industry with a future, enjoy the increased compensation and stop living in a vicious circle of never-ending decline.

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Post ID: @1uyv+1c971nfY

A learning company? Professors use you. Students hate you. As do their parents and pretty much everyone else who has ever overpaid for a textbook they never used.

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Post ID: @1rcg+1c971nfY

I say go for it if you are unhappy/looking for a change. I made a pretty big change and it's been enjoyable and certainly a change of pace and not being stressed over the workload and difficult customers all the time. I thought it would be a hit financially but it actually ended up coming pretty close for reasons I can't really figure out, lol.

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Post ID: @wvf+1c971nfY

Definitely keep an open mind, at least. I moved to a different industry, and while it's less rewarding than working at a 'learning company,' it's been much less stressful. I'm not waiting for the ax to fall every six months, or being plagued with multiple dodgy systems, or taking on additional responsibility without commensurate rewards. It was difficult to find something new but not difficult to adjust once I found a job. I didn't completely start over but did take a small step back. However, even if you do have to start over, given how stagnant the industry has become, you might still end up ahead of the game long-term. All the best to you!

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Post ID: @nzd+1c971nfY

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