Thread regarding Truist Bank layoffs

Calling for help

I'm doing everything I can do to help clients gain financial success and earn value driven revenue. I'm behind on the teller line because of the skeleton crew. I cannot seem to find time for coaching, no time for the motivator, my coaching by management is very limited, I am assigned a task like the playbook and told to complete it before the deadline, but disciplined for checking assignments. I've been with the bank almost 10 years and never been written up. This year alone I have been written up twice. It almost feels like they want to get rid of me. I am starting to lose faith in Truist, but I really want to succeed. I am hoping someone will read this and help those of us who genuinely want Truist to be the best of the best. For the first time in my career I am afraid to speak up. Are these written warnings a form of retaliation for being honest with my manager?

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Post ID: @OP+1dpb7lMZ

23 replies (most recent on top)

Truist will be a fertile ground for attorneys in the coming years. As someone mentioned, from a legal perspective much of it dances around the gray line - but from a moral/reputation perspective, Truist has done TONS of things 100% contrary to their laughably inaccurate public marketing approach. That is the angle where a good attorney makes hay, and where a little discovery opens up a lot of doors. SunTrust (true to form) pushed the personnel envelope in Texas several years back, and it bit them hard.

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Post ID: @iusq+1dpb7lMZ

Another good question for an attorney or a Senator to ask Truist-
How many employees were terminated in last 8 months for not complying with processes? for job performance reasons?

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Post ID: @gnqp+1dpb7lMZ

@HelpTruistPlease: While it is always a good idea to consult a lawyer, know that GA is extremely friendly to businesses and lawyers only take up cases that deal with race, s-x, gender, Whistleblower, etc. discrimination and lack of equal opportunity. However one doesn't have to necessarily take a case to court and one doesn't have to bother about winning monetary compensation. It is about justice and playing your part to a)Prevent other employees getting harassed in future b)bringing awareness of employer shenanigans. You or a good lawyer can always question Truist-

  1. How come so many employees were found in violation of process compliance when they followed all processes in past years
  2. How come so many process changes came about just as the company merger is coming to a close
  3. It appears more likely that managers did not properly (and consistently) communicate process changes.

You as an employer can always write to HR, Chairman and finally your Senator who is supposed to represent you. The Senator will ask the Chairman of the company for explanation of the case. And when many employees approach the Senators, the Senators may think about bringing changes to the Business friendly laws in the state to at least prevent egregious misuse. Employer always has the option to fire employees without explanation, without reason. Hence they have no reason to resort to lies, victimize employees and act in a very biased manner.

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Post ID: @geyj+1dpb7lMZ

HelpTruistPlease - You say that you are staying because of your clients. Do you think you are doing your clients a favor by making someone they care about (you) miserable? Does it not bother you to hide from them the type of bank they are doing business with? The great news is the job market is incredible right now, and I have little doubt the clients that really care about you will follow you.

Getting real for a moment, I see your option set as pretty well defined. If you think you might have a case, consult an attorney. Also, begin searching for other opportunities asap while you still have a job because your current situation is undeniably ominous. Good luck, and I hate so many good people are going through this…thanks Kelly.

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Post ID: @gjbt+1dpb7lMZ

@HelpTruistPlease

Policy changes must be accompanied by procedure changes which is a elongated process of documentation, reviews, communications. A supervisor cannot introduce a policy change on the fly. If you have not violated procedures in the entire years of service, then this accusation is suspect. Then what also needs to be seen is the severity of the violation. If it is a minor infraction, then clearly somebody is being targeted. Usually you have to be given a show cause notice for you to explain your position. If that was not given and a charge directly made, the supervisor could be in violation.

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Post ID: @giwk+1dpb7lMZ

The write ups just started in the last six months. The other branches in the area are not being held accountable because I know many of the Bankers. All of the Bankers at other locations are in shock about this; however, my area leader approved the write up for a violation of policy change. I am not wanting to play the victim card. I have helped so many people in my career of banking and I take pride in that. It is an awesome feeling knowing that because of my knowledge I was able to put cash flow into the pockets of clients and be apart of financial success for those clients. Now it's like management only cares about numbers numbers. I'm a top producer in my region, I might add, and I still get micromanaged and talked to about being a "weak leader". In the almost 10 years I've been with the company, I have used only 7 sick days (with the exception of COVID leave which I And the team was told to stay home because my teller had tested positive). I know where I stand in the eyes of Kimberly D. I will continue to do my best and stay off the radar for the sake of my clients who faithfully come to me. If it wasn't for my clients I would have left when this whole thing began.

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Post ID: @gjfj+1dpb7lMZ

Very good advice from @dpua+1dpb7lMZ. There are a lot of iffy things being done to employees, and the best way to combat this is with diligent, and specific documentation. My advice is an informal consult with an attorney, and get their input on whether a) you have a case, and b) what documentation you need to be collecting. I witnessed treatment of many great employees that made my blood boil; Truist is morally bankrupt and deserves to at least be accountable for what they are doing.

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Post ID: @egnv+1dpb7lMZ

@HelpTruistPlease
Did your writeups start suddenly?
In your many years of service, were there ever any issues or writeups?
Have you reached out to other employees in other branches? Do you know of others that have been written up?

Can you document how many have bene let go and work redistributed among the remaining?

Is the work distribution uniform among the remaining employees and contractors?
Are you in touch with those already let go? Were any fired for performance reasons? Were the reasons real?

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Post ID: @dpua+1dpb7lMZ

It's true, if you get written up a second time, you will be terminated. Depending on what state you live in will, will determine if you can collect unemployment. The best advice is to look for another position while you're employed. If at all possible go to an attorney if you get terminated, the bank hates bad publicity and the bank will agree to unemployment if backed to a wall. If it was me, I would write a response to the warning I received and to send it to his corporate HR department for two reasons. 1) It may make it harder for the company to fire you if you present a solid rebuttal of each point outlined in the warning. Secondly, If you do end up losing your job, you will have to make a case for unemployment. The written rebuttal is the first step in building a case that will explain to your local unemployment office why your termination was unfounded. Make sure you have copies of your performance reviews, and start printing out e-mails that illustrate the problems you've had with your boss. You'll need this paper trail to make a case to your HR department and/or to make a case to your local unemployment office.

Good luck, I'm sorry the bank has become toxic!

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Post ID: @btrf+1dpb7lMZ

Also-
If Write-ups exist, then likely you will NOT get- Severance or Unemployment benefits because your manager intends to fire you for job performance reasons. So get going with a plan. Another option is to go on short term disability leave which is 45 days extendible (ONLY if it applies to your situation) in which you get upto 60% pay fir the duration.

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Post ID: @aaan+1dpb7lMZ

2 write ups means your dismissal is assured but when it will happen will depend on the timing convenient to your organization. As somebody said below, job market is good and there is no reason to wait to find another job. But then as written below, you do not want to quit either. So hasten your dismissal by engaging your manager by asking- "you are ready to take up more work but if it crosses your capacity/do-ability, the quality will suffer, you would like to understand manager's expectations, and guidelines behind capacity and do-ability". Ofcourse manager will not have any rationale. Also document politely each discussion saying- " Just to summarize our discussions- bullets a,b,c". Your manager's survival instincts will kick in and will hasten your dismissal. Your strength lies in - Your teammates who know you and have worked with you, you understand your strengths and work ethics. So, make sure the writeups are seen by your confidants via screen share. Everybody will know the game plan put in place by Truist and get mentally prepared for the worst. You have to find another job- sooner or later, so you may as well lay the legal foundations now, then find another job, and then sit tight to see what happens in Feb and June 2022 when a whole lot starts getting laid off.

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Post ID: @aanu+1dpb7lMZ

The Board of Directors isn't doing you favors by offering you Severance money. They actually want something from you in return- sing on the many Terms and Conditions one of which is you absolve your rights to sue the company in any shape or form. There is a reason they rush you into signing this agreement. They give you 1-2 weeks to sign it. It is important to consult a lawyer before signing it. Board of Directors is nothing more than a substitute for the owner of the company. They may lay down a policy but there are always exception procedures designed to deviate in order to protect the interests of the company. The reason most employees end up signing is because they are not aware of what Severance actually is and of the exception scenarios. They only see it in terms of inevitability and money. This is how employers bait the employees into giving up their rights.

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Post ID: @avrh+1dpb7lMZ

@Mynoduesp While Severance is not a right, Severance is ALSO an agreement(Contract) that in lieu of money you will not sure the company for known issues and any unknown issues that get discovered in the future. As such anybody signing the Severance agreement will not be able to participate in a class action lawsuit. So it depends on the amount of severance amount and injustice done to you. If you are in the wrong, then I agree it is best to accept whatever money is coming one's way.

Also know most lawyers provide free consultation (it is strongly advised to document your case and timeline so as not to waste lawyers' time and to get the most out of the first free appointment). It does not hurt to get a review of the Severance agreement which lawyers will charge you but also refund you if they take your case up. If injustice has been done and you have spent an appreciable time in the company, lawyers can get you substantial sums. Watch many YouTube videos.

KNOW that Severance is an optional contract which is always low initially and can be negotiated. Again it depends on your length of service, position and if any injustice has been done to you that you can demonstrate.

Also know that you will meet lots of former and current serving employees outside who will talk to you about how they are being written up. As soon as merger work is over, expect a lot of firing and layoffs in batches. You never know what lawsuits may arise.

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Post ID: @8sqh+1dpb7lMZ

Re: severance: you are not owed severance as a right; companies don't have to pay you anything. Hiring a lawyer will just cost you money unnecessarily and could potentially put your severance offer at risk. Truist has a set severance policy approved by the board; don't expect deviation.

Work with this stuff all day, just trying to be helpful.

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Post ID: @8vsw+1dpb7lMZ

You don't have a case-

  1. If employer fires you without reason BUT you will be owed severance, do consult a lawyer because almost always employer offers only 1-2 weeks per year of service which is not right. It depends on your position, age and length of service
  2. If employer fires you for a valid reason and you didn't document your objections/rationale/circumstances behind that event in some form

You HAVE A case-

  1. If employer fires you for false reasons that you can prove by various kinds of documentation- chats, emails, meeting minutes, recordings etc.
  2. If you have informed employer of severe sickness in family and possibility of going on medical leave or short term disability leave or FMLA and the employer fires you just in time before you avail of the leave
  3. If you have been humiliated publicly in team meetings by your manager
  4. If the manager did not hear you and did not give you an opportunity to explain the reasons behind charges made by manager despite your requests wither in writing or in 1X1 calls
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Post ID: @8gcp+1dpb7lMZ

Thank you all for the guidance and suggestions. I appreciate the words of encouragement and genuinely hope the best for each and every one of you. Regardless of how my manager and her agenda to dismantle me, humiliate me on the Monday Morning calls and speak condescending towards me, I cannot allow that to get in the way of helping clients.

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Post ID: @6cfn+1dpb7lMZ

Most of it is politics by mid level managers who want to retain their favorites as everyone knows that a lot of people need to be let go. But the Chairman will need to know and even (just let us assume), he takes the side of his managers, at least he will be liable for answers should media gets wind of this. If there are enough people who feel they have been wrongly terminated then there could also be a class action suite. BUT Don't QUIT. if you quit you have No case. So stretch it as far as you can. But be prepared and armed with evidence on a day by day basis. Suggestion- Spend personal off-hours time to train yourself, take some colleague's help, document your personal efforts. Keep a running diary. Don't fret because this is the reality of a merger. Truist here is being nasty but some of its managers are plain stupid as they are writing up incorrect things in a rush that can be proven wrong. You wont need a lawyer, just common sense correspondence will do the magic. When you get fired, it will be your turn to do the write-ups and your manager will HAVE TO JUMP through the hoops to respond to you. This is ONLY POSSIBLE if you genuinely haven't done anything wrong. Most of the times managers wont respond because they are in a ho-e. They will get into trouble if they respond.

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Post ID: @6ipl+1dpb7lMZ

@HelpTruistPlease - They are def trying to frustrate you enough so that you quit. This is happening across the organization. Your team knows you best. Make sure you share this issue with team you have worked with in the last 10 years. Make sure you take everyone's feedback on work from both internal team members, even if by Skype, informally and from your clients, if you can. Make sure you pass the feedback to your boss as an attachment of all feedbacks so far. Make sure you document your work hours in calendar and every hour spent. I did that. Make sure you take printouts of all emails and evidences because once fired, you get locked out of the system. You are not even eligible to get records pertaining to you under FOI because Truist is out of its purview. Your strength lies in a)the honest work you do b)Your time utilization c) People you have worked with in the past and who know your work ethics and work quality. Do not go to HR at all, they are never on the side of the employee. Since your own manager is working against your interests, you cant complain to manager as you need to maintain your relationship with him as everything - your future, your longevity depends on him. Don't argue with him or pout things in writing because he will take it as an affront, and start arming himself with the ammunition you provide. So just talk briefly in 1X1 calls with him. But you make notes on your work computer of what you discussed and agreed to and take out the prints. Maintain your file. Start doing it now and start putting in some evening hours.

This write-up nonsense is happening to a lot of people across the organization. You can always make an issue after you get fired (politely of course) first with manager then with HR and finally Chairman of the co. believe me it will have an effect as others who are victimized will also be taking similar actions. Ofcourse the HR will swing in and inform you that they are starting an investigation. Most of the time that is a whitewash meant to protect the legal interests of the company and its managers.

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Post ID: @6ujk+1dpb7lMZ

@HelpTruistPlease - They are trying to make you quit. Find another job and get out of there before you lose your health and sanity. No workplace is worth it.

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Post ID: @3zzl+1dpb7lMZ

Classic case of a sick system. Everyone needs to become familiar with this: https://www.issendai.com/psychology/sick-systems.html

  1. Keep them too busy to think.
  2. Keep them tired.
  3. Keep them emotionally involved (this is how they royally sc--w over good employees who want to actually help clients).
  4. Reward intermittently.
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Post ID: @ore+1dpb7lMZ

The bank's intention is to have you quit. I've seen them write up many branch personnel, it's a nasty way of handling dedicated employees like yourself. It's the best time to look for another bank, this isn't the place you want to be anymore, good luck!

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Post ID: @dxi+1dpb7lMZ

Nc department of banking has 300 branches listed pending close across the entire bank this may be the problem

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Post ID: @hvc+1dpb7lMZ

As a Truist client, I am quite distressed to see so many posts such as this. I stumbled across this site by accident, and am appalled by what I read here. Truist does not sound like a competent bank, based on all these negative insider revelations. I truly hope management is aware of this site and is actively addressing the problems disclosed here. And by "addressing the problems", I mean fixing them, not silencing the messengers.

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Post ID: @rcc+1dpb7lMZ

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