Thread regarding Bed Bath & Beyond layoffs

10 replies (most recent on top)

The lawsuit, as with other retailers, had to do with the functions of the position. A salaried manager is being paid salary to manage and direct others as their primary role. As stores reduced payroll, salaried manager ended up doing more of the tasks as there were less people to manage. The general ruling by the courts is that if you have to do tasks for more than 50% of your expected work hours, you are no longer performing the functions of an exempt salaried manager and must be paid hourly with overtime for anything over 40hrs. In CA when we used to have dept managers and senior managers, the department manager went hourly around 2002? and the senior managers went hourly around 2005. The first state to make that change. Senior manager were still required to work 50 hours, but anything over that would be additional overtime pay.

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Post ID: @3izu+1eVBMb4E

the lawsuit had something to do with the other managers being salaried, i think they were salaried for a certain amount of hours but only being paid for 40, or something along those lines. my former ops manager was part of that settlement, and he hadn't realized until another manager from another store asked him about it

funny how quiet they kept that

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Post ID: @2ipj+1eVBMb4E

NLRB defines who’s eligible by workplace roles.
Based on what I’ve read, and my experience in store, only the SM is ineligible. ASM may be as well but that position was largely eliminated.

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Post ID: @1lov+1eVBMb4E

In California many hourly supervisors/managers in the grocery stores are not part of the union. They have similar roles to our key holders, but are considered management as far as the union goes. Those positions used to be salaried but we’re converted to hourly similar to the way ours and almost every other retailer in California.

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Post ID: @1jhf+1eVBMb4E

Only the SM is salaried and classified as a manager. Everyone else is an hourly employee.
I believe the company was sued many years ago because it was falsely classifying employees in order to salary them and force 40+ hour weeks. This was why the change was made several years back.

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Post ID: @1yse+1eVBMb4E

I think the person in the first post doesn’t realize that managers are not part of the union.

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Post ID: @1mgu+1eVBMb4E

BBBY would just close any locations trying to unionize. Based on our recent financials I doubt the company could remain in business with the additional costs from the benefits listed below. It would be the last nail in the coffin.

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Post ID: @1gzl+1eVBMb4E

So closing a B+ store with a key holder and a couple minor (16/17) associates?
Good idea?

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Post ID: @sfs+1eVBMb4E

What’s the down side?
Not working 60-70 hour weeks?
Not working 2 weeks straight without a day off?
Not working doubles open to close?
Having defined work roles and pay structure across the company?
Being able to take PTO?
Being able to take vacations?
Management accountability?

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Post ID: @qen+1eVBMb4E

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