Thread regarding Pearson PLC layoffs

All reasons why Pearson is failing

Of course, the leadership, or better said, the lack of real leadership is perhaps the biggest reason the company is sinking. But to make a list of all reasons would take far too long.

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Post ID: @OP+1fNoNmGf

10 replies (most recent on top)

OPM's days are numbered. How many worthless online degrees can the marketplace absorb? Not as many as there are today.

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Post ID: @7rwj+1fNoNmGf

I've been at POLS over 3 years and it's been unbelievable. So called leadership has continued to make nonsense changes hoping something will stick.It's equivalent to changing your clothes 4 times a day. When would you be deemed as insane with this type of behavior? Could there be a correlation that management had no prior experience before entering the role.For a job that could be decent, there are subjective mind blowing made up KPI's in place along with most managers lacking interpersonal/communication skills.Managers who try and be bullies with an ingredient of arrogance.Gees at least be a Dr. Or Attorney. If you receive 10 bogus text leads, you are somehow required to convert some of these leads. Wait, session budget goals were eliminated last Summer due to potential heat from the Dept. Of Ed but now weekly KPI numbers need to be met. Yep, no difference. And then your so called manager will advise in your 1 on 1 that it's your fault KPIs are not being met. Ignore the market has shrunk, an increase in competion, high cost, horrific leads and most importantly, prospective students dont like to be bothered with countless unprofessional marketing emails and phone/text pursuits. An actual student will generally call back within 3 messages but let's call them over 15 times as this lead cost us money. Telemarketing at it's best. Middle managers have jumped ship as well many employees. As one who has tried to have a positive outlook, this organization should just sell as there will never be any true leadership. Employees and students are just numbers. Goofy, hired from Disney with no experience, says it all. It is time to jump off as well.

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Post ID: @7vhj+1fNoNmGf

Times are changing - people are jumping off this Titanic at a rapid rate! Will anyone be left? Got to be sending the alarm bells off! Leadership is falling.

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Post ID: @5nwz+1fNoNmGf

@4mdi+1fNoNmGf. I can't disagree but time has just left that model behind. Remember the days when there would be reps with 20-30 year careers? These people were revered for their knowledge. When they spoke up in sessions, people listened.

It's just different now. Is the business fun for anyone? The answer is certainly no, at least if you work at Pearson, Cengage, or MGH.

But it is what it is. General Electric used to be a great company.

Time is ruthless.

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Post ID: @5qyu+1fNoNmGf

Pearson used to have an army of somewhat knowledgeable sales reps who had deep relationships with customers. Now reps sit at home and barely know their products and customers. We used to have an army of managers and specialist working in the field. Now managers and specialist sit at home tasking and sending emails all day. We used to have an army of marketing professionals. Now the marketing team sits at home answering chatter. We used to have an army of editors working with customers on review work, signing projects and helping the field close business. Not sure what they do now. We’ve always had poor product development and executives.

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Post ID: @4mdi+1fNoNmGf

It's a very simple concept. Nothing will change at Pearson. It will be death by 1,000 cuts. There will be no savior to rescue its employees or turn the ship around.

The choice is to either deal with it, or leave. Plain and simple.

How do I know? This type of complaining and clamor for change has been going on since I started in the business in the early 1990's.

Back in those days, (I was in sales,) reps not only openly complained, they just ordered an extra couple thousand desk copies and sold them to their local used book buyer. Call it revenge.

Instead of complaining, DO something about it. Leave Pearson and go work for a more agile and aggressive competitor, who does not have the legacy baggage. I did it and we made life a nightmare for large publishers. Trust me. That was fun.

Pearson owes you nothing and you owe Pearson nothing. Either you stay and take it, or you leave and work to damage it, (which is way more fun.). Everyone needs a villain.

But Pearson's not changing anytime soon.

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Post ID: @2lva+1fNoNmGf

Paying bills? Barely if that. I definitely am reading a priviledged tone here. Me thinks you have a vested interest in maintaining your position which I suspect is highly overpaid and solely requires you to string together nonsensical phrases to sell as values.
@2tib+1fNoNmGf

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Post ID: @2csd+1fNoNmGf

@2tib+1fNoNmGf Okay, I’ll bite, dear ‘employee of the month’.

Do you not think that everyone would like to be more productive generally? Because it’s clear from reading these comments throughout the threads that toxic leadership has caused a situation where many employees are simply frustrated.

Writing a comment here doesn’t mean that the person isn’t doing good work towards the right cause - I’d suggest it’s more likely the opposite in fact, and you’ve made an assumption there which makes me assume you’re coming from a privileged position, but that’s just my two cents.

And for the record, we provide a service to Pearson in exchange for compensation for our time - We use some of that money to pay our own bills and don’t owe Pearson a damn thing beyond that time and effort.

So that aside, in the spirit of comments that aren’t nonsense, why don’t you enlighten the group on reasons to be hopeful? And reasons to try harder? We’re all ears.

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Post ID: @2oby+1fNoNmGf

I hate to break it to you but the two apollos are unrelated. Apollo Global Management is who made an offer to Pearson. They have nothing to do with UOP.

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Post ID: @1bcu+1fNoNmGf

We have a lot of people who are working there with no experience in education and making decisions based on what they think. Apollo wants to buy out Pearson, but at what cost? They represent a for profit school with a bad reputation. Will our not for profit universities accept that or will they find ways to leave in droves? A wonderful company whose leaders have flushed it down the toilet. But, don't worry, we can have a dj for a ceo.

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Post ID: @1ael+1fNoNmGf

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