Thread regarding Union Pacific Corp. layoffs

Derailments

Link below…

The Surface Transportation Board is conducting an in-person hearing April 26-27 (EP 770, Urgent Issues in Freight Rail Service) with the CEOs of the “Big Four” Class I railroads—BNSF, CSX, Norfolk Southern and Union Pacific—on service problems. Class I locomotive engineer Matthew DeLay, without identifying his employer, sent this letter to STB Chairman Marty Oberman on April 19 as commentary for the hearing. It was entered into the Public Record by the STB Office of Proceedings on April 19. It is reproduced here in its entirety, with only minor edits. The opinions expressed here are those of Mr. DeLay, not Railway Age. – William C. Vantuono

https://www.railwayage.com/regulatory/it-is-getting-worse-people-are-leaving/

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Post ID: @OP+1gEyatnZ

9 replies (most recent on top)

I liked it when one of the board members called out the CEO's for not being there. The derailment statistics may or may not be correct, but look up the severity of the derailments and total cost of them. I'm sure the numbers are going to be WAY higher, than in the past.

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Post ID: @2lmp+1gEyatnZ

I love being in notch 8 for 12 hours a shift the other night I think a filling in my tooth fell out. Also my spine is really taking a beating since PSR. I would love to know the decibel levels in these DC locomotives with bad weather stripping. Anyone know of coworkers going out on disability for cumulative trauma?

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Post ID: @1unw+1gEyatnZ

Precision Scheduled Railroading is railroading you can count on, as long as you're only counting on it not arriving on time...

UPRR...delivering yesterday's freight tomorrow...if you're lucky.

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Post ID: @zch+1gEyatnZ

If trains got longer in the last 10 or 20 years as it has then data would suggest less derailments because of longer train length than before. All I know is Locomotives are being pushed to run notch 8 all night long uphill at a snails pace of 8 to 12 miles an hour with any back up Locomotive in consist and trains having to be patched with 2 or more crews from a location along its way from every terminal. This is what the grain and oil and chemical industries see and hate about today's railroad scheme. Aka precision scheme railroading

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Post ID: @uca+1gEyatnZ

I’d like to know the number of derailments w/o the funny math that manipulates statistics. The number of derailments in relation to car loadings for example. In my service unit trains keep derailing in the same curve in the last few years where as in the previous 20 yrs there never was a derailment at that location.

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Post ID: @jxt+1gEyatnZ

The government data I am able to find does not seem to support the idea that there is a massive (or any) increase in derailments. And this letter never provides any data supporting the premise either.
According to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, there were 1,056 train derailments (both cargo and passenger) in the US in 2021. This was the lowest number in the dataset going back to 1975.
Ten years ago, it was 1,470 derailments. In the year 2000, it was over 2,000 derailments.

In reality, the data suggest we are on a strong downward trend in derailments per year.

Is this government data wrong? Or is this writer trying out a career in fiction?

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Post ID: @dvs+1gEyatnZ

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