Thread regarding DXC Technology layoffs

I tried to learn as much as I could

I spent over three years here trying to learn as much as I could so I could get a better opportunity elsewhere. Now that I’m planning to leave and looking for a new job, I don’t think I’ve expanded my skills quite enough.

While this is largely the responsibility of employees to learn as much as they can, I increasingly think the problem is that DXC doesn't really offer many opportunities to upgrade one's skillset. Would love to hear your thoughts?

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Post ID: @OP+1gZwMRAP

6 replies (most recent on top)

If you would want to acquire any company paid training and time to train on the job, the department that you work in must enjoy support from upper management. Period. That means the department must be profitable and have a net positive. Only then will you get access to training programs and training time that aren't normally on the pre-approved list that DXC maintains.

More importantly, learning on the job is your most valuable asset. When you are learning nothing new, look for a new project to work on in an unfamiliar area of expertise. If that isn't possible, look for a new company where you believe you can actually grow as a person. Idle hands are the bad man's tools.

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Post ID: @4gzw+1gZwMRAP

Years at DXC had limited opportunities, as it was just endless meetings (I used to hate those - it was a real DXC thing to put 1hr talking shops in every week for little value, agenda or tangible outcome). The CBT's were quite outdated and any internationally recognised courses/qualifications would need a letter from the Almighty to even get on the waiting list. I left DXC and had learned so much with another company who believed in staff continuous learning and had the money to invest. Though I learned more from the opportunities and clients tbh. I then joined another company last year who gave me a few thousand for professional exams, training, memberships and would push any regional training sessions my way if I thought I'd benefit. I just think at DXC they were are so strapped for cash (or so they kept drumming it into us they were) that there was little incentive to develop and everything was done on the cheap. Even the clients noticed. But, as other have said, if they continue to offshore, then why should the company care about investing in developing expensive onshore resources, when it can be thrown overseas with the results we've all seen.

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Post ID: @2fcb+1gZwMRAP

It is not a training limitation but more a determination to offshore roles. For years this company has whittled down the numbers of staff in NA Europe and other places deemed to be expensive for hiring people. The problem is that over time people aspire to washing machines and tumble dryers regardless of where they live and that pushes wages up
In those places. So at some point this organization will run out of places to offshore to. What they should be looking to provide is quality service for their clients. If they achieve that then the money and the training and the profits will occur. But I fear not with the current executive.

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Post ID: @1tba+1gZwMRAP

In AMS region - email and yapping in meetings with no technical content is the best skill and we are hiring more of that breed.

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Post ID: @1gfn+1gZwMRAP

DXC does have good tools and resources for 'self paced' training / learning.

The issue I see is that people are so overloaded for work there simply isn't the time for most people to spend on learning. Ultimately that is bad for both DXC and the employee as skills and knowledge aren't kept up to date.

The other issue I see is that there is a lot of 'siloing' which restricts opportunities to work on other areas - often the best way of learning.

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Post ID: @1peu+1gZwMRAP

If you are working from US, you will not be able to learn technical skills as those are offshored. Where are you from?

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Post ID: @1yyi+1gZwMRAP

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