Thread regarding State Farm Insurance layoffs

Overworked

State Farm is not my dream job, but let’s just say I don’t complain about the amount of work I have to do. Yes, I work a lot, but I like my job, so it's not particularly difficult for me. There are many here who say they are overworked, but that is a very imprecise term. What does overworked mean? I wouldn’t want to sound like a cheerleader, but maybe someone who does your amount of work wouldn’t consider it that big of a deal. I am not trying to be provocative, I'm just interested in how you estimate that too much has been added to your plate?

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Post ID: @OP+1h6xlIhI

19 replies (most recent on top)

My first year, I would have made this very same post. Problem is, its not my first, second, third, ect year here.

While the OT and work is good when you are brand spankin new, and can appear to be off putting seeing workers gripe about it, put in a solid 5-10 doing that OT and you'll be here upset like the rest of us.

Once you realize it doesn't stop, the promise of future reward NEVER will pan out, and that if you are able to escape a bad department, they will likely force you back against your will anyway....you stop seeing the permanent mandatory OT status, that is likely illegal, as a benefit, and more as a negative.

Basically, this thread was likely made by a new hire whos hit the ground running, and its full of life, hope and happiness, before the company sucks it dry from him and asks for more. NGL I'm jealous, it was a good year for me too when i was new, before SF started asking me to go above and beyond for promised future reward. Its been a decade of this non stop with no real reward to speak of.

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Post ID: @4ojs+1h6xlIhI

Premium boys work so hard to waste policyholder money. Make a promise, take the money, party with it, and sc--w the people who keep the promise and the people that were promised. At least the people who keep the promise and the customer who was promised can sleep well at night with a clear conscience.

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Post ID: @2oyu+1h6xlIhI

50k agents, agents support staff and their families soaked it up and enjoyed as they should.

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Post ID: @2awv+1h6xlIhI

Man Garth was fantastic last night. Over 50,000 people soaking up a tremendous 100 year anniversary celebration. Rock on SF.

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Post ID: @2keo+1h6xlIhI

@1lqo. Leadership is leadership. Stand up to the SM and CM .....

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Post ID: @2uyl+1h6xlIhI

@1onx you could not be more wrong, maybe underwriting TMs have a sweet gig but certainly not a claim TM. We are sh!t on just as hard by our SMs and CMs as you are being sh-t on. The BS we have to endure and then pass along is mind-blowing. Claim TMs retire and die in a few years just like CSs because only the title is different, not the stress or work environment.

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Post ID: @1lqo+1h6xlIhI

You are not a human being? Maybe a cyborg or a bot?

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Post ID: @1zuo+1h6xlIhI

@1rri This is what happens when you do all their dirty work and NOT appreciated. They run you to the ground and not allow you to be a human being. Isn't technology just a wonderful thing?

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Post ID: @1pqt+1h6xlIhI

In operations, if you're in claims and underwriting leadership, it's a sweet job.
It's the non leadership operations jobs that have high turnover and a toxic environment. Quite telling that there is an issue, but the executives and upper leadership stick their heads in the sand about it.

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Post ID: @1onx+1h6xlIhI

Being active on phone calls for 8 hours a day(as in active conversation) limited social life, this will surely degrade your mental health over time. After 2 years of the “ask” never stopping. I vowed I’ll never be more than an owner/1099 ever again.

4 out of 7 days a week I can primarily do whatever I want. It took me about 2 months to recover from the stress, and constant endless gogogo micromanaging mentality. While working I didn’t notice these damages hurting me. It was during the transition I realized the stress fueled monster I was of a person. I’ve even dropped a lot of my employed friends to not have to hear the stresses of being employed.

The holidays, and birthdays I’ve missed because of SF wasn’t worth it in the long run.

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Post ID: @1rri+1h6xlIhI

Been around a long time. I find it amusing when I realize that in 30 years, people will be referring to MT’s profitable growth time as “ the good ol’ days”

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Post ID: @1rkp+1h6xlIhI

In the late 80’s we didn’t have “mandatory overtime”. But we had modest salaries and a crazy workload in Auto PD Claims. Often had an “official” workload of 40 claims/week, but it wasn’t unusual to have over 400. The files were paper. Calls came in nonstop and while the file MIGHT be on your desk, it was often on the CSR’s desk, or in the file cabinets, or on the Superintendent’s floor for the red ink review. Made a lot of trips to body shops, accident scenes, etc. We usually came in early, before the phones started ringing so we could get organized. At 4:30, we often headed out to a local spot for a snack and a beer, then headed back to the office for a few more hours of “no phones time”.
Most of us were 20-something’s, and there were several Service Centers in our metro area so many of us got together (with the 20-something Enterprise Rent a Car Reps) for FAC, etc. Many of those folks dated and are now married with adult kids.
It was hard work, and we were usually tired, but it was a pretty good time, all in all.

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Post ID: @1fru+1h6xlIhI

@OP - If you like your job, then you're not in claims. I suppose in theory, it is possible for a CA or a CS to enjoy their job. But that would be the exception to the rule. Unless you have some kind of fetish, most wouldn't enjoy being micromanaged to death, having pointed out every tiny error which is much less grievous than what your TM usually messes up, etc. That all combines to make a person 'overworked', aka burned out

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Post ID: @1zym+1h6xlIhI

If you really wanted to know, get the numbers from 1975 to present in terms of inventories, calls, and daily tasks. Compare and contrast. The argument that today you have technology is moot. Have mgmt bring those numbers to the table. They have them. Then compare. I'm sure you will find by todays standard you are doing 10x the work.

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Post ID: @1hfu+1h6xlIhI

Interesting perspective, and I think you are probably right.

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Post ID: @1hzs+1h6xlIhI

The problem we suffer from is perspective. If you started 20-30 years ago the company was at its peak as far as how the employees were treated. The claims department was the envy of the industry. If you were hired 15 years ago you thought ACC was the bo-b and how could it get any better. If you were hired 5 years ago all you know is express. Trust me, in 10 years from now, employees will be pining for the good old days when MT was in charge.

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Post ID: @1kom+1h6xlIhI

Estimate by knowing how many claims you handled 20 years ago and how many today with fewer people and more asinine file requirements. Oh and micromanaging people who couldn't do the job.

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Post ID: @1yvt+1h6xlIhI

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