Thread regarding Phillips 66 layoffs

WRR Maintenance leadership

Poor decisions led to $110 million LPO, unethical contractor selection regarding TA general contractor and material management, extremely poor leadership, targeted retaliation for opposing views, unfair hiring practices, running maint/TA groups into the ground, & ruining the reputation of the refinery with crafts nationwide. Is P66 finally going to make some beneficial changes?

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Post ID: @OP+1hWdi0o2

20 replies (most recent on top)

Now that the maintenance manager has been reassigned, his inner circle of cronies are going to try to act like they haven’t been complete a-s holes to all their coworkers for the last five years.
We’re all just hoping for basic decency to make a comeback since this narcissist is moving on.
Good riddance

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Post ID: @10cxb+1hWdi0o2

Being contentious and adversarial was all part of the fading regimes' game. Bully people into submission or they get blackballed. Many good (and not so good) people have left over the last five years as a direct result of the leadership (if you can call it that) style of the previous plant manager and who they brought in to serve under them. This includes the current maintenance manager, previous construction manager (who was demoted from corporate, back to a FLS), and the body filling the role of turnaround manager, with his tag-a-long buddy from the academy. There was no "creating an environment of trust", it was always the idea to cause as much discord and discontent to shift the light away from their own incompetence.

These people are the type to demand respect because of the position they hold, instead of earning it by gaining the trust of the team through action and accomplishment. We had that in the recent past, the people who rose through the ranks in to positions of leadership. Some may not have agreed with some of their decisions, but they were respected because they put in the work and showed the team they were worthy of leading. Unfortunately, over the past five years we've lost that. The ones who knew how to lead in our environment were pushed out in favor of failed tinker toy refinery management who would be more malleable to the whims of the previous plant manager. It became very clear, very quick that it was going to be a rough period while they were in charge.

I can only imagine how bad it would've been if there wouldn't have been those in the field (hourly and staff) that did what they knew was right and mitigated the poorer of the decisions that came from an office somewhere in MO/MOS. There was a lot of good done by those people, despite the poor leadership from above.

There is a reason the refinery isn't the premier workplace everyone was trying to beat down the door to get in to anymore, that blame lies squarely at the feet of the previously mentioned "leaders".

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Post ID: @ejzc+1hWdi0o2

I worked there. The atmosphere was poisonous. Nepotism was rife. The managers were not known for their intelligence and integrity.

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Post ID: @dsqb+1hWdi0o2

WRR is a classic example of too many yes men in middle and upper management. Those same people are in charge of hiring so guess what type of people they want….more yes men. I left last year for a lot of the same reasons mentioned in this thread. The reliability of the equipment and when TA’s are completed is decided by the business team and maintenance which should be the last 2 departments that make those decisions. Operations and the mechanical integrity group should be deciding that. When you make those decisions solely for financial reasons you end up spending more long term which is why they constantly have to cut TA’s, other programs and projects. This is also the reason they bring in the cheapest contractors money can buy. There’s a lot of rock stars at WRR that are great leaders but unfortunately they aren’t the ones making the decisions. It’s the select few that ruin it for everybody else such as the plant manager Jerry who ran the place into the ground over the past 5+ years only to get promoted to corporate.

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Post ID: @dcuj+1hWdi0o2

As a former WRR employee that was targeted for retaliation and fired I think the top two managers at this facility need to go for an improvement. Management has told me to my face my safety concerns do not matter. They will tell me what the concerned of the refinery were. That was in my first meeting with the plant manager when he was new it went down hill from there.

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Post ID: @daje+1hWdi0o2

worked in maintenance , went into management in projects and t/a,, we surrounded ourselves with talented people from the crafts as foreman,, people with real experience, and knew something about the work being performed... we estimated our own t/a work and required the selected contractors to meet or beat our estimates... you cant t allow contractors to do their own estimates, they are their to make money for their company. they bring in as many contract maintenance . workers as they can, over man the job and pad their estimates... proof of every t/a last 5 years going over budget and alloted time to complete work... need a good house cleaning in upper management...

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Post ID: @dozm+1hWdi0o2

There is a reason people are leaving behind upwards of $130,000 a year to work for less and have a better health and peace of mind. I left this year myself from operations.

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Post ID: @cupi+1hWdi0o2

Greetings,
Over the last 42 years I’ve seen many changes at WRR. Unfortunately the changes that have been made over the last 5 years have been disastrous. The qualities that upper management strives for and expects of middle management is morally wrong. Upper management use to strive to make the plant successful, now the only thing they care about is covering their butts and passing the blame.
I have been involved in many discussions in regards to the new transformation. I will be retiring very soon so fortunately it does not affect me. For those of you that do have several years left be prepared for a 20-40 percent reduction in middle management.

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Post ID: @coyb+1hWdi0o2

I hired into the P66 maintenance crew as a fitter in 2013 and under that management the place was the best job I had ever had. I truly believed that the management cared about the employees safety and morale. As soon as the refinery manager changed and surrounded himself with union hating yes men with no hands on experience it went downhill steadily.
When I hired in the majority of immediate supervisors and several of the higher level folks came from the crafts and pretty much all were came up from within the refinery. Soon they pushed all of them out and replaced them with college folks with zero working experience and ABSOLUTELY NO RESPECT FOR THE KNOWLEDGE HELD BY THE EMPLOYEES. They came down with heavy hands destroying any form of working conditions and blaming every shortcomings on the hourly folks.
We warned them for the last three plus years that soon they would not be able to find anyone who wants to work there, as contractors OR in house.
This has come to pass and they still don’t listen. I quit a month ago, even taking a pay cut to get out of there. I wish all the best for the hands still slaving away in there and hope someone gets smart and gets rid of ALL of the upper management, starting with maintenance and safety managers.

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Post ID: @bjwi+1hWdi0o2

So how many people are going to loose their jobs and at what levels is this going to happen? I believe they should clean out all upper management and then have a meeting with the hourly employees and get advice from the folks that actually run the plant and keep P66 making $$ and keep it safe. This place has been going down hill for five plus years we all think it’s going to get better but year after year it gets worse they don’t fix anything until it causes a release or almost hurts someone. And people are quitting faster than they can hire

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Post ID: @anhe+1hWdi0o2

Agreed, the current leadership at WRR is horrific with a few exceptions. The maintenance department is run by people with no maintenance background. How many failed TAs before change is made? Hopefully the new plant manager can turn things around. Attrition is high now and will only get worse after the business transformation is complete. There is no work/life balance as it is and after the transformation many will practically live in the refinery. People once begged for a job at WRR now they can’t get people to apply. WRR has to beg for people to go to work for them and once they’re hired in WRR basically looks for a way to fire them. This is the most poisonous atmosphere I’ve ever worked in.

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Post ID: @8tqo+1hWdi0o2

Most of Alliance management was horrible. Most RLT were terrible and even some supervisors and leads were horrible and lazy. I have notice that my management/supervisors are my new location are so much easier to talk to, actually work, and have functional knowledge. Too bad this transformation business will run good employees off to other jobs. I am sure the ones that will survive the transformation will have to work endless hours doing twice the work and reduced pay.

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Post ID: @5bal+1hWdi0o2

Very sad state in the leadership of the maintenance department at WRR. His lack of knowledge of any crafts and surrounding himself with more folks that lack knowledge but tell him what he wants to hear instead of what he needs to hear has ran this reliability into the ground. Metrics are a great tool but when it’s the only thing they are dependent on for decision making, well, this is what you get.

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Post ID: @4atj+1hWdi0o2

Alliance management may have their own set of issues, but we're talking WRR here. It is a shame WRR has become what it is, at least from a maintenance/TA standpoint ( two people in particular). Morale has been destroyed over the last ~5 years, trust in leadership has plummeted and you can see the resignation in people just trying to wait out bad leaders. As for the FLS's who do try and mitigate the bad leadership, they usually end up with a bad rating, while the good ratings go to the ones who keep their mouth shut and try to please the current managers (no surprise, just sad).

It honestly takes a pretty heavy mental toll to have to deal with that every day, especially when WRR has had better, and knows what good looks like.

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Post ID: @3nxl+1hWdi0o2

Rewind a week before the Hurricane when the sale announcement came out……they did have the mystical powers to run the place into the ground

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Post ID: @3uye+1hWdi0o2

I don't believe the Alliance management had the mystical power to stop hurricanes, but I could be mistaken.

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Post ID: @2obk+1hWdi0o2

Management from another failed refinery are definitely the people needed to fix WRR.

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Post ID: @2ble+1hWdi0o2

Over the past 5 years WRR has had heavy handed, rule by fear management. Driving the refinery from a place everyone was trying to work at, to a site that is nationally known to avoid unless it's a last choice. Little to no promotion from within anymore, it's all just managers getting their buddies jobs, regardless of competency. Attrition is way up, not because the job is bad, but because the managers are bad, especially the ones that arrived around five years ago. Here's hoping the Alliance people brought in have a better mindset than what's currently in place.

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Post ID: @1aps+1hWdi0o2

Why do think former Alliance management was sent there? If anyone can fix it, it’s them 😒

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Post ID: @1kev+1hWdi0o2

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