Thread regarding Pearson PLC layoffs

Will we ever reach at least some level of stability?

I’ve been at the company for 8 years, and not a year went by without some sort of reorgs happening. The threat of layoffs is something you have to learn to live with and there is always danger that they will throw you into some other organization.
8 years is not a small time frame. My question would be, is there any chance that we will reach at least some level of stability in which we will not need to fear for our jobs to this degree?

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Post ID: @OP+1heu8i5h

12 replies (most recent on top)

Here is the bottom line:
If you have to force users to buy your product, it's a sh!t product and the company will never see stability.

Pearson (and every other publisher) tries their best to trick their users into forced purchases.

In the early 2000's it was changing up the bundle ISBNs, customizing the preface and calling it custom, etc.

The late 2000's we see IA as a way to force students into purchasing.

It's all smoke & mirrors.

If consumers do not want your product, it is a problem. And Pearson's only way to make money in US Higher Ed is to do their absolute best at tricking consumers.

The cat is out of the bag.

The single best move that publishers could do at this point is to make an unlimited library of content: books, homework systems, etc EVERYTHING at a flat rate of like $20 a term.

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Post ID: @aiab+1heu8i5h

If today's announcement is any indicator, stability is the furthest thing from reality at Pearson right now.

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Post ID: @8wac+1heu8i5h

@2ngc+1heu8i5h Publishing used to be cool. I'm talking 30, 40, 50 years ago. You were proud to say that you produced books. People love books.

Today it's honestly a joke. At best, it's irrelevant. At worst, it's predatory. Educational publishing is up there with payday loans and towing companies.

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Post ID: @8tqo+1heu8i5h

@2ngc+1heu8i5h Your post is so accurate and the exodus you are seeing is no doubt people realizing it for themselves, coupled with seeing how fruitful other opportunities are. Imagine working in a job where your customers appreciate you and don’t call you the Evil Empire or the Enemy of Education??

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Post ID: @8cnt+1heu8i5h

The company is optimizing the use of automated systems to replace a good portion of the salesforce. It's been trending for years, but the new management is hellbent on making it a reality. We're talking a direct-to-consumer model that not only eliminates the need for a robust sales army (we used to be called the Red Army back in the day) but it makes the job of connecting educators, students and curriculum based on old models wholly obsolete. The only thing that may save you is your ability to foster IA in your territory. It's logical, pragmatic and a countermeasure to declining enrollments in higher ed. That said, there are still some really smart and dedicated people - really talented sales pros - who can take a lesson from the Story of the Chinese Farmer. In my very humble opinion, the clock is indeed ticking for many of us who have been here for a while. It's all good though. Max out where you can and keep your eyes and ears open.

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Post ID: @4idv+1heu8i5h

There is something coming. In our recent meeting, they could not guarantee that we would not see another layoff. We are given access to Invest in You. Use it to Ypsilanti yourself and get out. We are like rats on a sinking ship. The management is stepping on us to save themselves. Besides, with the low wages and high cost of living, we cannot afford to stay with a company that gives high salaries to the never ending exec team and nothing to us.

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Post ID: @3iew+1heu8i5h

Here's some real life feedback. I have a daughter who will graduate with a degree in mechanical engineering next semester.

I asked her how many publisher products she'd actually purchased during her four years in college.

Her answer? 10-15% of classes.

Students don't want the product. Professors don't care if they purchase it.

Find a business where your products actually add value that people are willing to pay for.

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Post ID: @2ngc+1heu8i5h

Not a chance given unprofessional, incompetent management remains in this dysfunctional foreign corp.

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Post ID: @2oqr+1heu8i5h

In the words of Liza Minnelli, “no”.

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Post ID: @1hmm+1heu8i5h

No stability until the company produces something, ANYTHING that consumers want.

That is no where in the near future as the company has no new product or technology investment coming.

Furthermore, enrollment declines are bad now -- just wait. There is a decline in the number of graduates coming soon as there were fewer births.

Fewer births = fewer 18-22 year olds = fewer enrollment.

Get out as fast as humanly possible. There is no reason why this company shouldn't collapse on itself.

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Post ID: @1mql+1heu8i5h

I was there for 6 years until the reorgs finally hit me. For years they said it wouldn't hit our function, then it finally did.

I wish I had seen the writing on the wall and started looking way before they officially announced the reductions in my function - as opposed to the twenty times they did it to other functions.

My honest advice is to start looking elsewhere NOW as opposed to waiting for the inevitable.

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Post ID: @1sgn+1heu8i5h

If you fear losing your job - get out.

If you do not fear losing your job - get out faster.

In the meantime, do your job as best you can, build those internal contacts & relationships, sock money away as best you can so that you have a resource to tide you over in case you do get the axe, and live your life as merrily as you can.

Really, what else can you do? And realize that it is FAR easier to find a new position while sitting in a current position.

But yeah - get out.

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Post ID: @1jev+1heu8i5h

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