Thread regarding State Farm Insurance layoffs

I'm surprised that more people aren't leaving

I've quit. A lot of people are leaving, but given the working conditions here, isn't it surprising that even more people aren't leaving? At one point I thought the attrition would be much higher. The management has obviously been very lucky so far.

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Post ID: @OP+1hyAvMI5

13 replies (most recent on top)

"Why aren't more leaving?"

Most do leave within a year. Less and less are staying as a career, and why would you now that there isn't a pension to lock you down here. You might have been in a solidly good department to not see the insane turnover that isn't a problem to the company.

Pay is low. Work is incredibly complex. Interactions with customers are extremely difficult at times. There is ZERO regard for the employees well being or desires in life.

No claims is where failed adults, and desperate kids end up. I have no issue admitting I've failed in life to be locked into a claims career that will probably stress me into an early grave. The younger generation doesn't care enough to endure as some of adult and older claims reps do, and it shows with the amount of empty seats (pre covid) around most entry level departments. In 2018 I remember visiting a friend in the total loss floor in the PHX office. I made a sarcastic comment "where is everyone this floor is empty" and a funny TM popped their head out stating "we have 60 open seats, you need a job? you know a friend who needs a job" in a joking manner, but, it was real. Later I heard they started forcing associates to work in TL as they couldn't hire enough, which probably increased those workers attrition significantly.

I would actually like to see on average how long an employee under the age of 30 (when they got hired) stays with the company. I bet the number of people who stay past three years is single digit.

No, State Farm sold its should to reduce costs, and is going to realize eventually how important good claim handlers are. The must be spending a FORTUNE on hiring/training/terminating

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Post ID: @boru+1hyAvMI5

Turns out, going after "whoever will apply to the job" has its downsides. This job isnt cut for most, and many will leave fast to find easier work for better pay.

They could either fix the easier work for better pay part, which they wont.

Or they could start hiring people they know will stick around, which they cant because you cant find that info out asking questions to be answered in STAR format.

Even if they knew their specific demographic of people right for claims, they would NEVER in a million years offer money to attract these individuals.

Claims is a hard sell. Its ok money, awful work, you get abused by customers, vendors, management, and your companies executives. You need to actually be smart, and good at customer service, and there's learning the insurance industry....or you can flip burgers for a few thousand less a year, or get a job as a general manager for a retail store for around the same as a BI adjuster and have a comfy stress free life...but probably worse benefits.

Bottom line, why do I care if the executives don't? This is the question claim handlers need to be asking themselves. This is the question executives might want to ask, why would a claim handler even care?

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Post ID: @4ymi+1hyAvMI5

Know a lot of folks sticking it out the last few years and in some cases months until hitting 55 to retire.

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Post ID: @3dff+1hyAvMI5

Bring back Robert Yi he drove the train right off the track.

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Post ID: @2wiv+1hyAvMI5

@2sgi Leadership hired them. Who made the first move? Leadership needs accountability and responsibility for their decisions.

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Post ID: @2ebk+1hyAvMI5

No, it is because our claim employees have the same brain level as spider monkeys-but not as cute.

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Post ID: @2sgi+1hyAvMI5

1qzq+1hyAvMI5

Perhaps the REAL issue is the quality/ability of the applicants that are available for jobs these years.

Yes, work at state farm is difficult and requires more than a high schooler who got participation trophies all his life.

Perhaps todays candidate doesn't have the capability of working any job, so fails out before the year is over.

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Post ID: @1iys+1hyAvMI5

In the 8 years I've been here I would guess the average attrition rate after 12 months is over 60% easy. Its been a horrific struggle to stay staffed every year ive been here. Every month is an "we need all hands on deck" month. Every year lots of big talk on resolving issues, and on a good year their efforts will simply keep the high attrition, where bad years sees their efforts to resolve staffing only increase attrition, and with their good workers at that.

Its a hard issue as its 100% reliant on out of touch, and uncaring, executives who would burn every claim handler at the chance to say a cost metric went down in a meeting. Luckily our inferior competitors that we strive to emulate also dont care about their handlers, as such, its ok in the eyes of management.

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Post ID: @1qzq+1hyAvMI5

I am not surprised at all. People that post on here lie and exaggerate in virtually every post-including the OP. They talk big and and are futile to do to anything. The reality is they cannot get a job anywhere elseā€¦..

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Post ID: @1obb+1hyAvMI5

You say you have quit, but still refer to "working conditions here" as if you didn't. Also, you are still infatuated with a post for SF.

Calling your bluff.

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Post ID: @1wfz+1hyAvMI5

Depends where you are at , in claims many sections have over 50% turnover.

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Post ID: @mqx+1hyAvMI5

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