Thread regarding University of Phoenix layoffs

There are still conscientious employees at Phoenix

I am one of them. I have no illusions about what we do and how we do it; however, we do educate students. A student in my course leaves knowing more on the last day than they did on the first day. Is it a quality education? Define quality. Much of the criticism related to governance and enrollment is warranted. There is no question we should invest much more in students and instruction than we have and now do. It cannot be defended. I hope the reputation can be improved. Our academics were never intended to compete with elite private and public institutions. We were purposed as a viable (and accredited) alternative to students who could not attend one of those institutions but who needed or wanted more education and in many cases were first generation college students in their families. I use the same text books and resources and have the same syllabus as my local "elite" state university. There are differences such as seat time, amenities, and instructional investment; however, the level of individual academic support we give students, is at least as much as a traditional student receives. At my campus we provide tutoring and mentoring at no additional cost plus frequent no-cost workshops on topics like math and stats. Many students would have failed or dropped out without this support, especially if matriculated at a traditional institution (even community college) where there are few remedial resources and very limited direct one-one, face-face, support for marginal students. Comparing us with traditional institutions is unfair and continuous assault on our reputation is harmful to the thousands of students, faculty, administrators, and support staff who have conscientiously matriculated and worked at Phoenix. By now everyone knows the history and the issues, so write something positive about students and instructors who remain committed to student development and education.

Good post from @ZvRIOAa-9mcc.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh

8 replies (most recent on top)

There are no conscientious employees at UOPX. There are only self-interested employees. The truly conscientious ones have been fired or have quit. But hey, I get it--it's hard to walk away from the salary and benefits if you are full-time, and it's an easy gig if you are adjunct. But don't kid yourself about the students getting a good education. At best the education is mediocre.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-acgq

did UoP layoff senior execs?

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-3dmt

@ZFRrceh-rjc, go ahead and continue looking the other way as UoPX collapses. That's one of the problems with relying on adjuncts who often have loyalties in other places.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-1ykl

OP, if being a wage slave and pawn in a dreadful conspiracy to rape the finances of the unsuspecting is your cup tea, don't try to compartmentalize and soft soap the damage done with self aggrandizement by saying that the students lives have been so enriched having experienced whatever it is you do.

That line of BS just doesn't fly anymore more, if it ever did.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-jgf

Dahn,

You clearly are unfamiliar with adjunct pay scales. Phoenix is in the middle. I don't care what happens outside the classroom. My job is to educate those in the class. If I concerned myself with recruiting then I would probably be biased toward some students, or at the very least have minimal expectations for those from structurally unequal environments. I earned my BA degree at a highly regarded Jesuit institution way back in the 90s. No one, and I mean no one, except those in the FA office, ever broached tuition, loans, repayment, education quality, or even jobs. No one ever suggested I should expect a job because of my matriculation and graduation. Yes, we did have a career center to support it but I did not use it. I attended college with a career focus, aspiration and intention. It changed completely and no association with the eventual career track I took, and little if any impact from the reputation of the institution (although it was good). The institution had no responsibility for my gainful employment. I went to a private university that was much more expensive than the local state university. I did not expect a job because of it and no one promised me a job. To this day I do not agree or support the notion that a university (unless a vocational school) has a gainful employment responsibility. I have always believed it was my sole responsibility. A major factor is the fact that workers change occupations and even industries numerous times in a given career. How can a university be responsible for individuals who end up in jobs or careers very different from their degree programs? The simple and correct answer is they cannot. What they can and should do is enable a student to develop and hone communication, research, critical thinking, social, and maybe leadership and team skills. These skills are what will propel graduates and students into good jobs and careers. You should drink some of the koolaid because what you are drinking is uninformed and clearly biased.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-rjc

The question is not solely about the quality of instruction, although who would want to teach at UoPX for those peanuts? It's about who is recruited, how they are recruited, how much they pay for the schooling, whether they have the ability or the means to graduate, and whether they can pay off their debt after attending.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-aoo

Well said.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-eah

Stop drinking the Kookaid. It’s not flattering.

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Post ID: @ZFRrceh-zmk

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