Thread regarding SAP layoffs

Short Term Thinking

SAP is no longer the same SAP it used to be who used to cared for it’s employees. Unfortunately not anymore. SAP board only cares about increasing share price but ignoring their engineering culture and acquiring companies. It’s become all about Sales. Then giving power to leadership of the acquired companies who in turn trash SAP and treats SAP employees like sh-- and lays off SAP employees.

Seen this happening over and over again. But this time Qualtrics takes the cake! 4400 SAP employees are loosing their jobs in 2019 to pay for Qualtrics - a survey tool company. SAP is not buying Quaktics for its products but for its customer base. SAP exes do not trust their own engineers teams.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU

15 replies (most recent on top)

next phase of short term thinking with financial engineering— share buyback!

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-zknm

actually, if you talk to the people who are in SAP, and came from one of the many SAP acquisitions, they will tell you SAP never use and develop their software as expected, and their solution is now worse off in SAP hands.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-6lsi

@ZektyHU-3poc

So, this is what "investment-strangled to death" means in SAP...

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-3bil

I work at sap. Out of every 10 so called engineers, there are prob 5 architects, 1 manager, 2 leader, and 2 developers. Real code is done by summer interns.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-3poc

@ZektyHU-3dtt

IOW, replace everybody who is to blame, who coincidentally, just happen not to be the engineers.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-3lkh

Engineering is required to develop any software, phone, car, plane or space shuttle. Engineers can do wonderful things (e.g. space exploration like the Mars robots or Voyager I and II) or screw up (e.g. Boeing 737 Max with the MCAS system).

What is the difference between success and screw-up? TOP MANAGEMENT and CULTURE.

Take SAP developers, they all OK on a one-to-one basis: good people, willing to develop and frustrated with the current / past situation. Unfortunately, as a whole, the success is far from obvious. Lots of excuses, legacy etc. At the end of the day, the Board decides on strategy, Top management promotes the leaders and you get what SAP is today.

One simple recipe to change things: replace ~5,000 managers from EVP to second-level managers abd bring new blood. However, this is unlikely to happen. Too much collusion and networks (back to CULTURE)

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-3dtt

The engineering culture can't even get their excuses straight.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-2fvc

@ZektyHU-2tfk

True, and SAP is not good at application integration for technical and management reasons.

  • low experience and mediocre tools because of monolithic background. Compare the effort to expose or consume e.g. a REST interface in ABAP vs. any other language.

  • low skills and high effort to do module and integration tests if the ABAP platform is involved. Extrem effort to setup a test landscape, do continuous integration and automated testing, work with mock implementations.

  • the inefficient development process and tools on the ABAP platform lag at least 15 - 20 years behind any other current platform and language (but the language is not the reason, it's the platform)

  • lack of understanding at management level that modernization of this platform should have first priority although it is almost impossible to create a marketing hype from it.

This change is possible, it was possible for years, but as the stock results show, it is probably not yet considered necessary.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-2eca

@ZektyHU-2zae

The issue with ANY inhouse dev at SAP is that it has to integrate in and comply with platform, applications and releases.

Thats the fundamental difference to startups that throw an isolated app on the market, make maximum fuss about it and sell themselves before they need to prove viability of their idea in a real enterprise environment.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-2tfk

@ZektyHU-pun

Yes, Goliath the underdog.

Do you know of any development team that thought it had all the resources it needed? Even the ones that eventually produced successful products?

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-2zae

Any SAP inhouse development has been investment-strangled to death ever since I watched. Its a good question whether that has been a result of McDermotts sole focus on external acquisitions or whether its a result of vision-free penny-pinchers in SAP‘s senior management.

Given the right resources SAP‘s dev teams could still swallow most tech startups for breakfast.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-pun

@eyr summarizes the issue perfectly

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-iar

This is not short term thinking, this is the result of 15 +years of failure to build any new product or creating a new UI. If labs cannot create new products while other companies ans start-ups increase the pace of innovation, there is no alternative other than buying companies. This is the only possible strategy. Organic growth was tried over and over and failed. Inorganic growth is the only way given the constraints.

Remember SAP ByDesign, remember how Fiori was created....

Unfortunately, acquisitions have a very high price tag and employees will bear the brunt of the necessary consolidations / simplifications

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-eyr

I wonder if these decisions were made using Design Thinking? HA HA HA!!!!

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-bjz

Because the engineering culture doesn't deliver.

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Post ID: @ZektyHU-sug

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