Thread regarding Chevron Corp. layoffs

Coming back from retirement?

Has anybody tried to come back into Chevron after a few years of retirement, especially after volunteering to retire during the layoffs of 2015-2017? What are the challenges of adapting to working life, working with former coworkers and new younger coworkers, after such a gap in working?

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Post ID: @OP+12Ab0BkG

13 replies (most recent on top)

Can anyone provide the contact information for the Bridges Program? Thanks [email protected] for providing a positive experience with Bridges.

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Post ID: @Gzvy+12Ab0BkG

I was retired for a while and did everything under the sun for several years. Eventually ran out of things to do and got bored. I came back part time just for the heck of it when I got an offer. It's been a blast. No pressure, no serious deadlines. Like being your own boss, almost. Gives me something to do, and I can quit anytime I want. Best decision I ever made and I've never enjoyed work as much as now. as they say YMMV

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Post ID: @mbzp+12Ab0BkG

I’m enjoying my retirement way too much to accept any job, even if it pays a little more.

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Post ID: @mihu+12Ab0BkG

Coming back from retirement after being laid off is like coming back from the dead.

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Post ID: @4tjt+12Ab0BkG

Makes perfect sense if they cashed out your pension so you can invest the lump sum they can’t reverse it as it was already charged off quarterly earnings. And if your severance included vacation payout that could be an issue. But I’m sure they would bridge the years of service on vacation days. They even do this for non chevron experienced hires.

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Post ID: @3lls+12Ab0BkG

@2ifl, I was told I couldn’t build on my 12 previous years of service for pension benefits or vacation purposes. Apparently, it’s long-standing policy. If my separation was 6 months or less, it might have been possible, but only if I hadn’t already taken my pension and also if I repay the entirety of the severance money I was paid after being laid off. You may relate to why I told the manager to F-ck Off. I wasn’t not about to accept restarting with Chevron as if I were a newbie of the street. Besides that, I already have a small and successful business that gives me much satisfaction.

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Post ID: @2uwz+12Ab0BkG

@12Ab0BkG-1ovf Surprising that you couldn’t build on your pension from the 12 year tenure. How does this work? What are the rules regarding continuity of service?

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Post ID: @2ifl+12Ab0BkG

I received a call from a manager at Chevron in May 2019, 3 years after I was laid off with 12 years of service built up toward my pension benefits. They wanted me back in a full time capacity for my specialized training and experience. I asked why was it the company didn’t realize my value back then. This manager didn’t have a reason or a false excuse to give. I told the person I’d consider coming back only if my eligible years of service is restored for pension benefit purposes. I was informed it wasn’t possible. I told the person to go F-ck Off. Simple as that. In the last 3 years, I started a small business that is doing great and best of all, I am my own boss. Best thing ever. God Bless all of you who may be facing trying times ahead. Prepare yourselves and if let go for whatever reason, never look back to Chevron. Forge ahead as best you can.

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Post ID: @1ovf+12Ab0BkG

Yes, I did that. It's been a blast, the most fun I've ever had at work, no stress, no pressure, they can lay me off at any time, no worries, be happy to go. The only mistake that I made was taking the lump sum rather than the annuity. The annuity would have had me set for life living in luxury but the lump sum that I had to take needed to be used to pay off debt. No problems with who I work with, they're all fine. Kids will be kids but most are willing to learn the ropes the right way if you give them a chance.

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Post ID: @1dwu+12Ab0BkG

I know several who are back as full-time contractors in Houston via the Bridges program and they are thrilled with it. This is the best way to do it. You can maintain flexibility on hours and vacation. Pay can be as high as you negotiate. You don't have to put up with any politics, meetings or processes. As one lady commented "I worked here 35 good years, was able to cash out my pension in invest the lump sum, and am right back working but without the BS."

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Post ID: @1npj+12Ab0BkG

OP’s question sounds sincere to me. There could be issues about the PSG, pay, reporting structure (for example, you could be reporting to somebody who was once junior to you). You need the right mindset to handle this. I am sure somebody has done this. I would like to hear from them too.

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Post ID: @1jwl+12Ab0BkG

Let me ask you a question Bkg. Are you serious Dude? oO

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Post ID: @rpn+12Ab0BkG

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