Thread regarding Extreme Networks Inc. layoffs

I think Extreme strategy is simple

Get rid of all old leadership positions with new younger innovative leaders. Old leadership seems to have a strangle hold on the remainder of the company. From what I’ve heard is that they want to dissolve employees who have long tenure because they don’t want anyone talking bad about leadership and management of Extreme Networks. I find that appalling to those who have remained there from Cabletron/Enterasys acquisition, they have the longest tenure in the company. I realize leadership has focused on not upselling their old employees, keeping them pigeon holed into their positions as there are no opportunities to advance on a dying ship.

Originally posted by @fgas+14unXf8g.

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| 2009 views | | 7 replies (last )
Post ID: @OP+14Niizo7

7 replies (most recent on top)

I worked there for almost 4 years. It is a toxic "me first" culture that is unlike anywhere else I have ever worked. Run as far away as you can.

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Post ID: @fxdt+14Niizo7

It’s so bad they even got rid of Anis P.

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Post ID: @3upy+14Niizo7

Well said. Most existing folks at Extreme are well served by the observations here.

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Post ID: @2nfc+14Niizo7

Extreme Networks is where dreams go to die. Stay away!

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Post ID: @2gbz+14Niizo7

Hmm, the Cabletron/Enterasys people don't necessarily have the longest tenure in the company. There are people who came in via the Avaya acquisition, whose service time was grandfathered to their original date of hire at Avaya, who have now been with the company longer than Extreme Networks has existed as a company. Most of the people who have the really long tenure are not in "decision making" roles, they are mostly manufacturing ops, just turning a crank.

If you want to shoot holes in product & marketing strategy then you need to look at the top of the product management, engineering and marketing organizations. You need to focus on Nabil, Eric and Norm. Nabil came via Brocade acquisition. Eric from the outside, Norm via legacy Extreme. Despite what you may believe, the product managers and engineering managers who run the various programs have little to no input with respect to product strategy. All they get to do is decide if feature X goes into release 1.0 or release 2.0.

Norm tends to not get into the trenches. It's really the Nabil and Eric show. Nabil has a hard-on for whatever the latest buzz technology is, regardless if it fits the business model - he wants to make it fit. Eric is more worried about "executive level social networking" in the valley than he is about helping Extreme.

At the end of the day it's the hardware and service that pay the bills. That isn't s-xy to Nabil & Eric.

Extreme's main strength is their service organization, which is a culture that came via Cabletron. Sales also has a culture that came from Cabletron, which is toxic, at least it was when I was there.

The products will never ever achieve feature parity with Cisco. Eventually, Extreme, like SynOptics/Cabletron/Bay Networks/Wellfleet/Nortel/Brocade/Avaya/3Com and many others will either be acquired or fold their tent. The industry is changing and the old guard, with the exception of Cisco, is being sunset. Cisco won the hearts and minds of its customer base in the late 90s, when Extreme was a startup. Extreme never had a chance to topple Cisco.

If you're still there, get out at the first opportunity. If you're considering working there, only do it if you don't have a better option, Extreme should be your safety school. Cisco has it's own issues, just because they are king doesn't mean it's nirvana there.

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Post ID: @2eyy+14Niizo7

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