Thread regarding Anadarko Petroleum Corp. layoffs

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"If a contract at issue lists epidemics or pandemics as a force majeure event, the claiming party could argue that the coronavirus qualifies in light of the fact that is has been officially declared a pandemic by World Health Organization.
If a force majeure clause does not list epidemic or pandemic as a triggering event, it is possible that the coronavirus could be covered as an act of governmental authority in some areas, given that many governments, including the United States government, have instituted lockdowns to prevent the spread of the coronavirus."
Force Majeure is in play because of emergency laws shutting down businesses

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Post ID: @7prc+14RoOf3T

COC is ERISA protected there is no force majeure
buncha BS is right

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Post ID: @4vwt+14RoOf3T

Exactly what I thought. OP is just starting BS

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Post ID: @3axx+14RoOf3T

We know what force majeure means. What we want to know is how this applies to the CoC and specifically what does the July 1st date mean mentioned by the OP.

People need to stop with the stupid cryptic posts and provide reliable info.

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Post ID: @2oow+14RoOf3T

Force majeure is a common clause in contracts that essentially frees both parties from liability or obligation when an extraordinary event or circumstance beyond the control of the parties, such as a war, strike, riot, crime, epidemic or an event described by the legal term act of God, prevents one or both parties from fulfilling their obligations under the contract. In practice, most force majeure clauses do not excuse a party's non-performance entirely, but only suspend it for the duration of the force majeure.[1]

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Post ID: @2jdl+14RoOf3T

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