Thread regarding UnitedHealth Group Inc. layoffs

Lay Off Impact on Next Job

Folks, I got some tough questions:
(1) when you get laid off, will your managers likely to recommend themselves to be your reference? If they do, will they mention you are laid off from UHC when talking to your new job HR?
(2) Should you tell your new job HR you are laid off from your previous job? Will that impact new job HR's final decision?
(3) are you still contacting your old manager in UHC after you get a new job?

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Post ID: @OP+15Fk1HiC

8 replies (most recent on top)

Hey Dude,
There is nothing wrong with being impacted by a corporation's mass lay-off. You are going to have to explain the gap in your resume anyway. Many managers and directors that you have worked with at UHG/Optum will be happy to be a good reference. Also, get a copy of your last MAP, especially if it was a 4 or 5 and you can also reference that with any new employer. Go on LinkedIn and buff up your profile and start requesting contacts there, that is where the majority of recruiters go to find you. Good luck.

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Post ID: @kpqo+15Fk1HiC

"@2wvh+15Fk1HiC I gave 2 weeks notice and they are trying to get me to sign a confidentiality agreement do I need to do this? I signed nothing when I was hired."

I don't think you're legally required to sign a confidentiality agreement if you gave 2 weeks notice. In an "at will" employment state, either the employer or the employee can end the working relationship at any time. Giving 2 weeks notice is a courtesy to the employer, however once you give notice, they can ask you to be done working before your 2 week end date.

For whatever reason, I think they're just trying to cover their bases to have you sign the agreement before you leave. It may be due to the department or area that you worked in. It's their fault for not having you sign one when you were hired. I wouldn't sign it unless I had to.

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Post ID: @anei+15Fk1HiC

I gave 2 weeks notice and they are trying to get me to sign a confidentiality agreement do I need to do this? I signed nothing when I was hired.

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Post ID: @2wvh+15Fk1HiC

In agreement with the rest, legally, other companies can only verify the dates of your employment, how much you made and if you are rehirable. As far as references, that information would come from the people whom you list as references.

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Post ID: @1vim+15Fk1HiC

Note that you were laid off. I did and stated how it impacted me professionally. I didn't go into great detail. I noted how I was blindsided despite doing (here is where I listed all the tasks I did, projects completed, awards received, etc). I also relayed how I used the experience to tighten up my skills and understand the business better. Layoffs happen in every industry-it does not make you a pariah or as if you deserve a scarlet letter. I interviewed with 4 different places and had an offer from every single one. Good luck!

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Post ID: @1eic+15Fk1HiC
  1. Legally, UHG can only verify that you were an employee and give them your dates of employment. They cannot give out any other info.
  1. I was laid off in October. I've been honest that the reason I was let go was because of corporate wide layoffs. Layoff is definitely better than being fired. Saying I was laid off was never an issue with potential employers. It came up in interviews but it's only a big issue if you make it one. When I was asked why I left UHG, I just casually said that I was part of a corporate wide layoff and my position was eliminated. It never stopped the interview process or prevented job offers. Practice saying it out loud to yourself until it becomes 2nd nature. It's awkward at first but it gets easier.
  1. I'd only use your manager as a reference if you can really trust them to give you a positive reference. If you don't trust what they'd say to a potential employer, then don't use them. I'd ask other coworkers or people that you can really trust to be a reference for job applications.

Reach out to people in your network and ask them to write a recommendation for you on LinkedIn. You can read what's written before it's posted and delete it if you don't like it. Every potential employer goes to LinkedIn to check you out. Upgrade to the premium version for a month and you'll be amazed at how many people are checking out your profile. Make sure to write a reference for anyone that writes one for you.

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Post ID: @1pmw+15Fk1HiC
  1. My manager said she'd love to be my reference for future job hunting (suprised). Not sure what exactly she said to new employer though.
  1. You should, honest is better than hiding if they ask.
  1. You gotta know the choice to make you leave is part of your manager's decision.
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Post ID: @iat+15Fk1HiC
  1. My understanding is that a new employer can only verify that you were employed with UHG. Your manager cannot be a reference. If your manager is called, they have to just refer the caller to HR.
  1. It's certainly better to have been laid off than fired. So if you were laid off, you should tell the potential new employer the truth if they ask. You can't pretend you still have a job if you don't. It's probably easier to find a job if you already have a job but once you are laid off, you are out of choices.
  1. I remain in contact with a few friends from my time there. My manager was definitely not a friend and I hope I never cross paths with that witch again.
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Post ID: @dds+15Fk1HiC

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