Thread regarding Intel Corp. layoffs

Long-term career at Intel

It’s devastating to realize Intel can no longer be considered a business to retire with. This company doesn’t value its employees and hasn't in many years. We are no longer seen as vital assets that can contribute to the success of the company - and many here known this. New hires know this as well. Most that join now do so only to learn what they can and usually move on in 2-3 years.

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Post ID: @OP+17ZUQvJu

16 replies (most recent on top)

time to stop desperately clinging on to Intel and stop being dead wood, develop some marketable skillsets and get a job elsewhere...

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Post ID: @bdoo+17ZUQvJu

Global Supply chain is another example of hiring a reject executive who is known to have a poor reputation outside. Intel keeps hiring rejects and giving them bigger and bigger responsibilities. Just talk with employees who work at his prior companies. But anyway if you spend just 5 mins with him you will get the gist of it.

Now, Swan the clown calls him the chief supply whatever. Bob is clueless, really or he just gravitates towards sh– people, clowns - aicha, asha, etc.

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Post ID: @3liq+17ZUQvJu

I worked in the supply chain org for >15 yrs. It turned toxic in the last 3 years because the VP hired fab jockeys who were only good at back stabbing others. The VP paid for the incompetence by getting fired. Being African American couldn't protect him from the incompetence.

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Post ID: @3iif+17ZUQvJu

The are many companies that have healthy, productive, cultures. If you work at Intel just for the money you have sold your soul to the devil.

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Post ID: @2yfv+17ZUQvJu

The feedback I got during my Insights session was that I need to improve my PowerPoint presentation skills so that higher management can understand my work better. I hope i will get a good raise with this kind of feedback.

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Post ID: @2mrs+17ZUQvJu

At intel the actual work is not hard. dealing with dumb-a– managers is the hard part.
It is exhausting to educate them, create slides for them, write speaker notes/email summaries so that they can take your work and communicate to their superiors - HARD.
Listening to them giving you lectures about how we all need to add value - VERY HARD.
You go to the insights meeting to hear some input from dumb–ses. All you get is whether you can write all those feedback sections and send to them. What about your feedback. Oh, you get it when they will update your write up.
The company is beyond repair.

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Post ID: @2krb+17ZUQvJu

But the Management has been making it out like bandits at Intel
CEO Pays
2016 BK - 19M
2017 - BK -21.5 M
2018 - BS (part year CEO) - 16M
2019 - BS 67 M - made more than Lisa Su
2020 - he may crack 9 digits!

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Post ID: @1nfw+17ZUQvJu

Intel has reduced benefits. Employees used to be #1. Now employees are #10. Stock options gone for RSUs. Pension gone for new employees, capped for existing. Redeployment quietly cancelled. Layoff plans from 2 weeks per year (+ typically 8 week bolted on) of service to 1 week per year. Layoffs all the time. Layoffs when they say there wont be layoffs. Cell phone cancelled. Oncall pay greatly reduced or cancelled. 401k contribution reduced from 12% free money to 5% match. All bonuses have anti-employee changes made over the past several years (ie no more partner of choice). I believe HR must sit around figuring out ways to sc-ape the bottom of the barrel for a few extra bucks at the employees expense. Reducing the 401k contribution by 7% and then calling it competitive is shallow. Dont get me started on the culture changes. The company was built on a hard working success oriented culture. Now HR people who have been out of school a few years and don't know the company are changing all that. The layoffs are depressing. The company will do anything to save a buck and the performance on tick tock shows. Did I mention being laid off is horrible? If you are 10 plus years in, you have a target.

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Post ID: @1wty+17ZUQvJu

A lot of TMG is fairly secure, but make sure to pick a job with transferable skills. In my previous role, I noticed the experienced people were doing trivial work/stuff only used at Intel for 50-70 hrs; the required skills at other jobs did not match up. I also only planned to be there for 1-2 years from the start. Luckily, there was an internal position open that’s more difficult, but will open up more opportunities. Don’t overlook all of Intel because of one bad experience.

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Post ID: @1pyh+17ZUQvJu

As much as various TMG affiliates make things more difficult than they need to be, working for an IDM is the main reason I've stayed so far. So much cost cutting has been done that you see projects die from a 1000 small cost cuts. Hopefully it's not too late.

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Post ID: @zhm+17ZUQvJu

Those who’ve transitioned to FAANGM and the like, what business groups were you and your peers from and how removed were you from TD/manufacturing? My experience has been that the closer you’re to manufacturing, they drown you with busywork that’s exhausting and unfulfilling at the same time leaving you with little time to develop orthogonal skills.

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Post ID: @jfw+17ZUQvJu

I think working at Intel definitely provides value. Hear me out.

In many (not all) groups at Intel, you can have a good WLB specially if you don't care about your focal and salary appreciation. But that's a moot point. Here is why. Intel although not the best paying, it still has a lot of benefits like a typical big corp has. So one case stay here 1-2 years while spending 90% of her energy on leetcode and interview preparation and remaining 10% split between family and work. So working at Intel is like an extended low stress vacation that allows you fantastic opportunity to really become a top player in the interview game. I know literally dozens of people who joined Facebook, Google, Netflix (yes!) from Intel. Intel helped them a lot by allowing them the room to prepare.

It's not all bad. Exploit the good stuff.

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Post ID: @kit+17ZUQvJu

Left on my own in 2016. Saw how the company treats its employees. tired of the layoffs every 3-4 years and the way the upper management mismanaged the company. Best advice is to leave on your own and find a job somewhere else

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Post ID: @gpv+17ZUQvJu

Yes, that is true. Most of the learning has to deal with soft skills like politics and managing upwards. Still you need to get some projects shipped on your resume to have something to talk about in interviews. For the SWEs, I mostly told them to keep on leetcoding, which coincidentally a startup created by an ex-Intel SWE. Probably not a coincidence. That guy went on to Amazon then Google before starting Leetcode.

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Post ID: @hfi+17ZUQvJu

I'm not even sure what you could learn at Intel in 2-3 years that would help you at a different company. Most of the tool flows are proprietary and/or antiquated and aren't used elsewhere.

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Post ID: @lwp+17ZUQvJu

I served as a mentor at Intel. I advised all my young and ambitious mentees (H1Bs and citizens) to learn what they could in 2 years and leave. My biggest accomplishment was them thanking me for the advice after they got offers to FAANGM (minus the N, since Intel has almost no skill overlap with that company). Some of them more than doubled their salary at Intel. I also left this year. My biggest regret was to work for this sh*tshow of a company, but at least I helped people see the light and get out (even some long term Intel employees who've been there for 6+ years.) I did what I could. Shut the door and turn off the lights. It's closing time Intel.

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Post ID: @sbi+17ZUQvJu

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