Thread regarding ExxonMobil Corp. layoffs

Investors are optimistic about XOM

https://seekingalpha.com/article/4417294-exxon-mobil-corporation-could-double-fossil-fuels-are-not-dead

Based on this article and its comments (as well as the rest of the XOM articles/comments in SA), there's a lot of optimism about the company in the future. Yet anyone reading through this forum would definitely think the opposite. Why the big disconnect? Which group is wrong, the analysts/shareholders or disgruntled employees?

by
| 994 views | | 8 replies (last )
Post ID: @OP+1aoc1ItD

8 replies (most recent on top)

OP must have been a planner at URC or one of those loser valuation advisors at URC. The intellect is worthy of any RTD or EMIT role though.

by
|
Post ID: @2veo+1aoc1ItD

Same investors who were optimistic about Enron and Worldcom?

by
|
Post ID: @1knv+1aoc1ItD

XOM is not a buy nor is it a long term hold. At best its a short term swing trade. Even for the latter you may have already missed your window. Way better places to put your money right now.

by
|
Post ID: @pxi+1aoc1ItD

@lpy+1aoc1ItD

That is what some people do. Sounds like you are one of them. If that is what it takes to make you feel good about yourself, that is your choice.

by
|
Post ID: @djc+1aoc1ItD

Technology advances and new products are accepted when they provide consumers with something that improves their lives, esp in the short term. Renewables, EVs, etc are currently accepted by a relatively small percentage because they believe in the cause and are willing to accept the trade-offs including cost, inconvenience of charging stations, etc.

Many, many people do not want their current fossil fuel powered cars, homes, tools, etc. taken from them. And many believe that drastic changes in the name of almost insignificant improvements from the climate change movement are not worth it. These will be huge barriers to large scale conversion even in developed countries. This, along with much more difficult technical barriers to overcome (aircraft, trucking, heavy machinery, etc) will likely sustain fossil fuels as a primary energy source for many years to come in developed countries. Undeveloped countries will need fossil fuels even longer.

Good advice on any topic should never be taken from a site like this. Do your own research.

by
|
Post ID: @lrd+1aoc1ItD

Analysts and disgruntled employee might be both true... It all depends on what your standpoint is. In my view, there's a short term opportunity for fossil fuels until the renewables really kick in. My guesstimate is 5-10 yrs. Beyond that well... Demand will decrease but there will always be a need for oil and gas in particular for some applications where they can't be easily substituted (e.g. plastics) and to supply fuels to countries where “green” legislation still allows it. I thing that EM and other fossil fuels producers will remain in some niche markets and may end up like the tobacco manufacturers... Much smaller, but still profitable... For the shareholders.

by
|
Post ID: @bqx+1aoc1ItD

Post a reply

: