Thread regarding Wells Fargo & Co. layoffs

How frowned upon is job-hopping on a resume?

I've changed three banks in the last six years, one regional, then BofA and now I'm here. I joined thinking I was making a positive move for my career but that turned out to be a bunch of crock. Out of the three, this is by far the worst place to work. Not to mention, growth opportunities are non-existent. Now I'm looking to move on again, but I'm beginning to worry about my resume. I'm starting to look like a job hopper, and that might affect my prospects down the line. Is that not a big deal anymore or should I just stick it out here for a few more years?

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Post ID: @OP+1eVf820a

17 replies (most recent on top)

I consider that old paradigm created by employers and echoed by frightened workers but I am in IT and I don't know how "portable" your role is so obviously take what I say with a grain of salt.

I retired from WFA last Feb after 8 years due to dissatisfaction with my new "platform" duties and been hired 3 times since. Employers always wanna know why you left have a reasonable explanation that puts you in a positive light, if they don't like then move on to the next.

Left first 2 jobs cause I didn't care for the duties and not all that sure about the 3rd one I just started :). Yea I know that's extreme but I really don't need to work so I don't have anything to lose so I'm not going to do something I don't like.

Don't let the sheeple frighten you into staying in an unhappy place its your career. Know your market and if you got the qualifications go for it

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Post ID: @4wew+1eVf820a

Go back to BoA for the next step up, companies love that stuff

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Post ID: @4igp+1eVf820a

There’s no point in speculating. Don’t quit. Search. If you find a better job you’re confident you can stay in for 2-3 years, take it. If you don’t, the job hopping may be why. Stay put and keep looking. The best way to get the information you’re asking for is to job search now. And the other responders are right: maybe don’t confine your search to banking.

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Post ID: @2xpm+1eVf820a

Job hopping every 2 or 3 years is favorable, and good for your bank account.

Job hopping every 6 months is not.

Staying with the same employer for over 5 or 6 years is detrimental, unless you can show movement to different jobs every few years within that company.

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Post ID: @2lhm+1eVf820a

You are a job hopper if you leave Wells Fargo now. Give it another 3 years, then it will be fine.

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Post ID: @2bqu+1eVf820a

As with many things in life "it depends". If I see a guy who's had 7 jobs in the last 12 months, it's entirely reasonable to think that there might be an 8th. That said, it's hardly the only consideration.

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Post ID: @1unx+1eVf820a

If you work in Banking Operations, it is not good because it will look like you either cannot handle the job or you get bored easily. Potential employers will view you as a risk. However, if they are desperate for new hires and not paying that much, they may just welcome you with open arms.

You may also want to ask yourself if working in Banking is right for you.

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Post ID: @1tac+1eVf820a

Just be honest. As a manager who fired for years, I’d appreciate the honesty and I would understand (personally) and wouldn’t even think twice unless other indicators of demeanor and responses indicated you had contributed to the problems that led to your leaving

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Post ID: @gtx+1eVf820a

Depends on the industry. In tech moving around every couple of years like I have done is perfectly acceptable so long as you explain yourself during interviews.

I don't stay anywhere past two years if I determine there is no personal or professional growth potential.

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Post ID: @xbh+1eVf820a

Working for the same company for decades with no promotions, no raises and using obsolete processes and technologies shows that your skills are not current. You are likely too risk averse and probably unable to handle change effectively.

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Post ID: @wjr+1eVf820a

In the beginning of your career most people better job hop after college or you will be stuck with small annual increases and you will get back to a good place in the market if you move over 4 year. 2 years is fast because there is only so much of a difference or accomplishments but even Saul said it is nornal

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Post ID: @yng+1eVf820a

it depends. what type of work you do, the stage of your career, whether you can actually show significant accomplishments etc. if this is the third 'hop' in 6 yrs, you're pretty much at the point where any more is going to be looked at as problematic - so choose wisely with this move

Cover letters are rarely read and resumes are at best skimmed - so it will stand out,

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Post ID: @ykp+1eVf820a

2 year stints are fine. Only way to effectively increase your salary.

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Post ID: @cws+1eVf820a

I wouldn't stick it out or sweat it. One thing you will need is a good narrative for the changes that doesn't make you sound greedy, hard to please or negative. Make sure to reinforce how what roles you interview for are more aligned to what your path is moving forward.

Good luck!

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Post ID: @dwk+1eVf820a

Was each move for more money? Or, to learn something new, broaden experience, take on more responsibilities? State so in resume. If not a fit at WF, state that in interview. These days, moving around not the big deal it used to be. Might want to think about changing the type of employer, banking might not be the right place for you, depending on what you are doing. Banking, if customer contact, is essentially selling financial products.

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Post ID: @puy+1eVf820a

Depends on whether move made just for money, I think. If to broaden experience through new skills, say, or take on more responsibilities, then just state that. If WF position not working out, then just say it wasn't a fit. Move on. Life too short.

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Post ID: @bat+1eVf820a

I tend to avoid folks when I see a lot of job hopping on resume or contrators whol list half a page of responsibility for a 3 month contract

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Post ID: @qyz+1eVf820a

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