Thread regarding HP (Hewlett-Packard) layoffs

Why is HP no longer innovative?

I don't have many complaints, but if someone asked me what I despise the most about this company - I would say that one of the things is that this is no longer an innovative company.
I wonder where all the innovation has gone here?

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Post ID: @OP+1feZeeQ5

9 replies (most recent on top)

Innovation? Yeah right, like the Dragonfly???

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Post ID: @Wezj+1feZeeQ5

Buying companies like Plantronics is the only innovation HP knows. Maybe Plantronics will give HP a foothold in going head to head with Jabra and Logitech on communication peripherals?

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Post ID: @Mhqo+1feZeeQ5

Signs of issues go back to the mid 80's Inkjet printing came along and became the financial support for HP or a couple of decades but it has been shrinking for some time. Various ideas didn't pan out. Maybe something will pop up but nothing is on the horizon.

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Post ID: @ezjj+1feZeeQ5

Once you spend a lot of money a couple of times on something that fails (like 3D printing) there isn't another big bucket of money stilling there to try something else. This has been happening to HP (I and E) for a couple of decades and it's all catching up. There just isn't the funds to keep trying new things until something catches on.

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Post ID: @5mzo+1feZeeQ5

Must be your cr---y org. We're innovating.

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Post ID: @4okf+1feZeeQ5

Apparently the original poster is not in the R&D department. I see lots of innovation going on. Just because it has not hit the open market place does not mean new products are not being developed. Some products are being made specially for individual customers (other companies) are never seen outside of those customers. Page Wide is booming right now and there are several others in development.

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Post ID: @2cmv+1feZeeQ5

(I'm a commenter from the last post that talked about CES2022)

I wouldn't say that we don't innovate but nowadays it requires you to jump through a lot of hoops. The company much encourages us to always think of new innovations. But I would say that innovation has slowed down considerably here.

Marketing and system management tends to be the reason why. However, if you have a pretty solid idea, they are willing to listen. But if it costs too much, they see it as risky. You need a very good reason about innovations you wish to bring to the table. But even if marketing thinks your idea is good, engineering and R&D may tell you otherwise, and they have better reasons pertaining to actual feasibility.

HP has metrics on who files patents and how many, who brings in new features, and who brings in new key focus technology ideas. They do incentivize innovation with bonuses and recognition.

With this COVID work environment that was created, companies are doing some massive re-analysis of their strategy where they can fulfill the needs of people returning to the office, people doing a work hybrid 50/50 in the office and at home, and people who will work from home permanently. This also includes the education market as well. Innovation, admittedly, should be increasing dramatically. But it's not... Why?

Cost, supply constraints, and "but will it actually sell?"... It's not that there aren't any people who want to be innovative; it's because of things that are gating items that prevent us from being creative.

Bottom line, you can have a great idea for a product but if marketing doesn't think it will sell to make a good profit margin, it's not worth implementing. There needs to be a large enough demand to justify the solution you want to provide.

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Post ID: @1juw+1feZeeQ5

What is the date for hpi service to be turned over to Hemmersbach

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Post ID: @rzi+1feZeeQ5

No idea, but it feels like they haven't been for a very long time now. At least 2008, maybe before.

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Post ID: @pmt+1feZeeQ5

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