Thread regarding Ford layoffs

What's the likelihood, in percent, that Ford will win the electric game and come up on top of the industry?

Be honest and generous!

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Post ID: @OP+1hos5aLJ

12 replies (most recent on top)

There aren't miracles in battery technology. Too many factors affect battery performance and total vehicle performance. People's motivation to get a BEV is also complex. Some may be activistic, other's want to be part of "the change", other's like the performance of a >performance BEV<, then other's think they can reduce their operating costs (LOL), and there are folks that don't like the dictate by the oil industry and dealerships, then there people who decide which car to buy and may think BEV is what's next. Which one of these are the ones going for longest range?

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Post ID: @1rsy+1hos5aLJ

Ford is currently “ahead” in the BEV game with the Lightning and Mach-e but that lead is a mirage. The current BEV offerings took ICE platforms and stuffed them with already dated battery technology. It’s only working because there are so few alternatives to Tesla, but that’s going to change in the next year as competitors bring their BEVs to market. If those vehicles are anywhere close to what they say they are they will lap the Lightning and Mach-E in technology and range. Tesla proved that the EV manufacturer with the best and longest range batteries will win. We’re way behind on that front as Hau originally announced we would source batteries from suppliers and then did an about face when he belatedly realized that strategy would be a disaster. Meanwhile we’ve given our competitors a head start of several years on their battery tech. When those hit the market the Lightning’s going to look like a Model T.

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Post ID: @1fly+1hos5aLJ

0% and I am being generous. Reasons are too many to be posted here, but let's say that the company is in a complete disarray now (low moral, clueless managers, a lot of red tape, lack of dealership), there is a lot of competition on BEVs (and Ford started last), and the most important of all, it is the wrong market for the company.

BEVs is a niche market dominated already by Tesla. How can you compete against a luxury "trendy" brand when your own brand is about providing "affordable" vehicles "for the great multitude"? Ford is not a luxury brand. The company should be trying to dethrone Toyota or get ahead of VW worldwide (and it cannot do even do that with all its expertise in ICE).

Anyway, I am sure that, before I can retire, I'll be reading about Ford in those articles about failed famous companies, with the likes of Sears, Blackberry and Kodak. SMH.

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Post ID: @1oom+1hos5aLJ

@ljl+1hos5aLJ

I would somewhat agree in that the company is good at data collection currently and that's a very important part of the game because you are the owner of that data and every car is a data miner so you can get new data as you need. And sure, you can build data centers and what have ya. That's for the data science part; this is really big in the US currently. And Ford can gather data very fast going forward.

As far as software goes, however, I have a hard time agreeing. Software can be coded anywhere and there is world wide competition. And its going towards automated coding as well. So why would Ford be best here?

Mostly though, I think the issue is with the company announcing big goals and its ability to fulfill on them as well as people not really seeing Ford being there.

I mean think about it: Ford still carries huge loads of old baggage in pensions and old liabilities. Any modern software company doesn't. On top they may have excellent ties to India and China. And now you want to compete with that? On a world level? And be best? You wouldn't just rebuild your company. You would stomp it and start something completely else that is new for that. Lot's of people kicked out, new ones hired and you end up somewhere in between...

But what's really conflicting is that the company wants you to celebrate this new direction, which you won't be a part of for long. It's too ironic to be taken seriously.

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Post ID: @1eij+1hos5aLJ

85%

Before you dismiss me, I would ask if any of you have watched and paid attention during the various leadership meetings/town halls and the videos that get posted on our atFord homepage about the company transformation. The only reason I rate the chance at 85% instead of something higher is because nothing is a sure thing in this world environment right now, but I am confident Ford will be a data and mobility leader when the "electric game" is in full play.

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Post ID: @ljl+1hos5aLJ

Is this a joke? I mean, are you serious? Not a chance in h-e-double hockey sticks.

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Post ID: @mpw+1hos5aLJ

Ford cannot compete in that market. There are too many things required to make it work that are not in place. First, their platforms are outdated. Second, senior management's style tends to be followers of a trend - not leaders of it. Next, the consumer who can afford the electric vehicles historically are avid car enthusiasts with money. Why would they waste money on a problematic new fangled vehicle when they could buy and show off a classic antique instead. Last but most important is Michigan's infrastructure cannot handle the load of more than 3 electric vehicles being charged at the same time - on the same subdivision street. The result is a streetwide blackout. No, without updating the product platform, having leaders with trendsetting management styles, interested buyers with money, and an infrastructure that can support it, no ford won't do well in this market.

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Post ID: @rsl+1hos5aLJ

Unlikely. The Lightning and Mach-E platforms are going to be incredibly dated in 2 years tops.

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Post ID: @nxe+1hos5aLJ

Ford is not at the top of our industry in any category, and it is highly unlikely we ever will be with our current “leadership.”

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Post ID: @wtb+1hos5aLJ

I think it's very unlikely, under 10%.

It's so hard to change the mindset.

To win, this needs to be a new company, unburdened by the history and 'our way' stories.

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Post ID: @htx+1hos5aLJ

Why didn’t ford ramp up electric cars in 2005? Instead they waited till 2018 when they had no other choice. They didn’t want to compete on volume with VW,Toyota, etc. They failed at luxury, premier automotive group, small car..any car for that matter since they don’t make them anymore. Mullaly mindset of building less and charging more put them in a bad place, no one ever heard of loss leader before? The Ford of the 80s or 90s was better than today…more offerings for different tastes..I like a 2 door coupe/sedan that is NOT a mustang, or affordable economical transportation that I can afFORD, not a $100,000 pickup.

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Post ID: @evk+1hos5aLJ

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