Thread regarding Chevron Corp. layoffs

Are new hires getting paid more than existing employees?

Some say yes and I wouldn't be surprised at all if someone who was just hired earns more than an employee who has been loyal and dedicated to Chevron for years.
However, I still refuse to believe that this is true... Perhaps it's true for very rare individual cases.

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Post ID: @OP+1j1xPj3e

18 replies (most recent on top)

What's a new hire to you? Out of college or an experienced hire? If you come out of college in an analyst job you could be making more than an admin who has been with us for 30 years. I was hired as an experienced hire and was making way much more money than analysts that were here 10+ years. ALL DEPENDS

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Post ID: @nlyc+1j1xPj3e

To stay market competitive they do in many cases bring in new hires at a higher salary than current employees in the same position. But if your manager cares about parity they’ll give the current employee a raise and a promotion within the same year to keep it fair.

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Post ID: @6uvh+1j1xPj3e

This is true and has always been. Many were hired from outside with experience in another industry or just graduates and brought in due to nepotism (brother-in-law, niece, nephew, daughter, son). It was amazing how they moved up to psg 26-28 so quickly.

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Post ID: @5yod+1j1xPj3e

I guess you are right - I should have refused the promotion so I could enjoy it in a future year and not be stuck.

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Post ID: @3teh+1j1xPj3e

@2oz, promotion does not equal raise. Since pay ranges overlap significantly, you can get a promotion to the same salary (i.e., more work, same money). If indeed you got a promotion AND a significant (>5%) raise, congratulations, but eventually that's going to catch up with you. Nobody keeps getting promotions and big raises, unless they've been designated for EVP.

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Post ID: @3ray+1j1xPj3e

For some (not all) college new hires, this can happen when inflation rises, like now. During high inflation, starting salaries can rise faster than what the first year hires get as part of the annual salary program. The chances go up for this to occur for college hires that get the highest rankings in the interviewing process. If the salary compression issue (new hire salary vs annual program salary) continues through several years (ie real high inflation) then management & HR have in the past made some across the board upward adjustments for the young professionals ...BUT it is very rare. Also ... CVX says it pays for performance and sets completive salaries. They never directly say that salaries go up because of inflation.

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Post ID: @2qmb+1j1xPj3e

No, I actually got a nice promotion the next year…

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Post ID: @2ozf+1j1xPj3e

@1jnn, that's an age-old trick. They just gave you your next few raises ahead of time, your salary is now going to stall unless they designate you a high-pot. You'll be back here in a year or two complaining about small raises.

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Post ID: @2upl+1j1xPj3e

I got a great offer from a smaller company years ago and Chevron matched it. They said it was an automatic adjustment I was gonna get anyhow…

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Post ID: @1jnn+1j1xPj3e

No doubt there is a 'backroom plan' to pay those from favored universities, or the right demographics, more than others. In the past it was just those from the favored universities.

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Post ID: @1ykh+1j1xPj3e

This is true with any job with most companies. The only way you are gonna get any larger than a 5% raise from year to year is to leave the company you are at and move to a different one. Mid-level managers will never put their career on the line to get approvals for larger raises.

This has always been the case, except if you work for a small shop.

Years ago I jumped from one firm I had been at for 10 years (only got 1-2% raises) for another firm and instantly was making $30k extra a year a the new firm.

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Post ID: @1fcm+1j1xPj3e

White males need not apply.
Many of you who are inclined towards wokeness and affirmative action will before long realize the theorem of “equal and opposite reaction” is very true, and it not only applies to physics.

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Post ID: @1zrp+1j1xPj3e

If it becomes an issue HR will eventually recalibrate and adjust the existing staff at lower ranks to make sure they are paid more than the new folks. It has happened before when the industry was really hot and starting salaries zoomed up.

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Post ID: @1naf+1j1xPj3e

It's like buying Auto Insurance. If you stay loyal to one provider you'll pay more than a new sale for the same vehicle. Shop around.

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Post ID: @1ybo+1j1xPj3e

Only the ones giving hand and blow jobs are being paid more.

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Post ID: @1gxf+1j1xPj3e

Yes, this is a fact. The job market is very competitive for center/support services jobs, especially for candidates that check the requisite diversity box(es). Petrotechs… not so much.

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Post ID: @1mad+1j1xPj3e

If you were just hired as a trader, you probably make more than the loyal and dedicated guy who has cleaned the restrooms for years. The job matters, proven experience matters, skill set matters, education matters, etc. What kind of a d-mb post is this?

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Post ID: @1feb+1j1xPj3e

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