Thread regarding Cisco Systems Inc. layoffs

Not scared if LR

I see all these people b--ching about Cisco LRing older employees in favor of college grads. Only thing I can say is it's your own damn fault. I'm 56 years old and a grade 13. I'm not a manager. Never once have I ever been scared I'd be laid off. It's all about keeping your skills sharp. If you're on a dying technology move to a new one. If you get acquired and LRd yeah that's totally not your fault you got screwed. But for others stop blaming Cisco and ask how did you screw up to the point you got LRd.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu

11 replies (most recent on top)

| Keep flying under the radar, though and make it last as long as you can. At 56, you can look forward to a job at Walmart once you get laid off. No one hires over 40 anymore.

If no one hires people over 40, then there’s going to be a LOT of competition for that job at Walmart. :-)

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-Bbfj

To the OP: You are a fool. Cisco targets older employees to the point of even creating recruitment campaigns clearly stating that they want the average employee age to be early 30s. Cisco is full of slimy managers and executives. Cronies and favorites abound. You can do all the uoskilking you want but eventually your time will come. Keep flying under the radar, though and make it last as long as you can. At 56, you can look forward to a job at Walmart once you get laid off. No one hires over 40 anymore.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-znzy

Not necessarily true! I was in a group (dealing with cloud computing - the area that Cisco management said they were concentrating on and therefore laying LR'ing people in other areas). Had been with Cisco 20+ years, age 50+ and I got laid off in September, 2016. Part of the severance agreement we had to sign was that Cisco would not release the demographics of the layoff (ages of all people affected) unless we signed the severance agreement relieving Cisco of all liability. Part of the agreement also was that we could not recruit any Cisco people for a period of 1 year and we had to agree not to say anything negative about Cisco, either verbally or in writing. Everybody I knew of that got laid off at the same time I did were over the age of 50.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-nmzz

I just watched Cisco train a whole division, send a bunch of them through school and cert programs. Then can all their asses. Yes, staying sharp and keeping your skills fresh will probably keep you in some job. However, lots of people are lied to at Cisco. There is a reason they don't have formal performance reviews and it isn't because they care about "skill". This is their MO.

Recently, they even had some f---ed up "if you are depressed, then go get yourself fixed" days, because the moral s---s. They also had a narcissistic child of an exec claim that she invented charitable giving in November.

Anyway, don't take my word for it. Look at all the senior executives voluntarily leaving the company over the past year. Many of those that can leave for better places are because it isn't about skill, it is about who they can pay the least. Those cheap 13s are nice to keep around. Who wants to stay in an abusive relationship.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-agwb

I am surprised at the OP ignorance to how Cisco operates. Politics first, customer impact/revenue second, skill set third.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-4sau

You’re full of it. I’m also extremely technical (older than you and G12) but never made 13, for three main reasons 1) visibility not easy when you’re remote and have no cheer leader rooting for you to push the promotion through 2) constant reorgs changing your reporting structure (see previous point) and 3) diversity comes into it, very difficult to get mentoring unless you fall into a protected group (see point 1).

Only last week, Cisco let go an extremely talented engineer working in Europe. This guy was absolutely gold. He had written research papers and documents for technical standards organizations, was working on big upcoming technology shifts and currently working on a large customer project.

If you think being a G13 techno widget can save you, I have a bridge for sale.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-4boz

It's all about your manager! I have always kept my skills up and was LR'd due to politics and joining the wrong team.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-3qsc

I'm happy for you, OP. I don't know of any non-managers who've made it to PG 13. I was LR'ed and I certainly wasn't on a team that was dying technology. Sys Admins have to stay current on the operating systems, hardware and security in order to provide development systems to the developers who make the products & services that Cisco sells. I just happened to be the oldest on the team when I got LR'd. I watched a lot of good guys get let go. All of us found good jobs quickly, so we're talented resources for companies willing to keep older workers.

I don't complain about it. I've had 2 severance packages from Cisco. If they want to hire me and give me a third, I'll take their money and chuckle at their stupidity of letting me go and then hiring me back. If I wasn't good enough, why would they hire again? If I'm good enough, why do they keep letting me go? Either way, I have plenty of job offers and it's easy money.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-2hkb

Keeping your skills up have nothing to do with getting LR'd. In the 1 1/2 years before I was LR'd I completed 5 Cisco Certs and 1 VM cert. I took some addition courses on web sites like Coursera in regards to SDN and python.

I think it was more about backstabbing between employees because everyone knows another LR is coming around and they had to be positioned so they could survive. I don't play that game and it cost me.

I tried to suggest new ideas to the team on improving efficiencies and being more productive but the legacy Team Lead threw me under the bus many times via group emails. He liked to be king. Cisco kept several people on the team that did not even have one Cisco Certs but they were yes man people. Worked a lot of weekends pulled a lot of all-nighter's for Cisco and tried to be loyal to my employer.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-1xqp

I have seen 3 very powerful senior directors cut and made to leave without much ado. people I thought were insiders and untouchable. they were "gods" and loved to throw their weight around.

and once the lion king is deposed the fate of his pride (the pack of crony line managers) is like that of orphans nobody loves....his managers all had long faces and were kicked like footballs all over...some left...some migrated to other groups to try their luck. none have any real power now.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-pas

Nice attitude, I had similar the day before my number was up. I even had a conversation with a peer talking about which slackers would be cut and how hard it would be if person x was on the list.

The reality, however, is that the LR had nothing to do with my skill or even ability to s--- up to the boss. My skills were significantly more in line with the work the survivors had after I was gone.

The reality is that I checked off multiple boxes, young enough (40s) that I balanced an older worker while being old enough that my replacement could be young.

It took little time to get a position at one of the big tech companies - so I agree with you that keeping your skills sharp is the key... But don't think for one second that keeps you safe. Cisco isn't a company that values technical ability - it values how much it can save and to that end everyone is just a number.

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Post ID: @X6hqvEu-xdi

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